adulteration


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Related to adulteration: Adulteration of food

adulteration

 [ah-dul″ter-a´shun]
addition of an impure, cheap, or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen, or falsify a preparation.

a·dul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl-tĕr-ā'shŭn),
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration

/adul·te·ra·tion/ (ah-dul″ter-a´shun) addition of an impure, cheap, or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen, or falsify a preparation; in legal terminology, incorrect labeling, including dosage not in accordance with the label.

adulteration

[ədul′tərā′shən]
Etymology: L, adulterare, to defile
the debasement or dilution of the purity of any substance, process, or activity by the addition of extraneous material.

Adulteration

Pharmacology The substitution of one material or substance for another, such that a manufactured product is incorrectly labelled and/or dosage information is not in accordance with US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) requirements.
Vox populi The addition of an ersatz to a thing, which decreases its potency or value, or adds unnecessary ingredients.

adulteration

Pharmacology The substitution of one material or substance for another, such that a manufactured product is incorrectly labeled and/or dosage information is not in accordance with the FDA requirements, which ↓ potency or value, or adds unnecessary ingredients

ad·ul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ā'shŭn)
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration,

n an accidental or purposeful addition of an impure substance to a product. This results in an alteration of properties and composition of the substance, thereby diminishing its quality.

ad·ul·ter·a·tion

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ā'shŭn)
The alteration of any substance by the deliberate addition of a component not ordinarily part of that substance; usually used to imply that the substance is debased as a result.

adulteration

addition of an impure, cheap or unnecessary ingredient to cheat, cheapen or falsify a preparation. Adulteration of ox beef with horsemeat is an example. See also substitution.
References in periodicals archive ?
The letter, written by the TI chairman, has highlighted a complaint it has received against OGRA for the procurement of the Fuel Marking Award Contract to minimize oil adulteration .
Shortages, increasing prices and large consumer demands lead to food adulteration.
When preparing for FSMA's final Intentional Adulteration rule in May, it's important for businesses to be prepared and protected.
Sweets with fancy price tags can pose a health hazard if rampant adulteration and poor hygienic conditions prevailing in kitchens and workshops are not kept in check.
Olive oil, milk, honey, saffron, orange juice, coffee and apple juice are the seven most likely food ingredients to be targets for intentional or economically motivated adulteration of food, or food fraud, according to analysis of the first U.
Of all forms of adulteration the most reprehensible was the use of poisonous colouring matters in the manufacture of jellies and sweets.
27% Table 3: Results of the Samples with percentage of Adulteration No.
Pepsico Holdings India Private Ltd, the Indian subsidiary of the US food & beverages giant PepsiCo, has failed to get relief from the Gujarat High Court (HC) in a 17-year-old food adulteration case.
Although microbiological contamination and chemical hazards have received most attention, it is recognized that food adulteration and food fraud should not be neglected considering their role in public health (2).
7, No 131, adulteration refers to the "act of weakening or contaminating a substance by adding another substance of lower value to it".
com)-- Focused Mitigation Strategies to Prevent Food Adulteration