adsorbent


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adsorbent

 [ad-sorb´ent]
1. pertaining to or characterized by adsorption.
2. a substance that attracts other materials or particles to its surface.
gastrointestinal adsorbent a substance, usually a powder, taken to adsorb gases, toxins, and bacteria in the stomach and intestines. Examples include activated charcoal and kaolin.

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt),
1. A substance that adsorbs, that is, a solid substance endowed with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without any covalent bonding, for example, activated charcoal.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt)
1. A solid substance with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without covalent bonding.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.

ad·sorb·ent

(ad-sōr'bĕnt)
1. Substance that adsorbs, i.e., a solid substance endowed with the property of attaching other substances to its surface without any covalent bonding, e.g., activated charcoal.
2. An antigen or antibody used in immune adsorption.
References in periodicals archive ?
FLUORO-SORB(R) adsorbent, resists competitive adsorption from other water and sediment contaminants.
Our material is tailor-made for selecting uranium over other metals present in seawater and can easily be recycled for reuse, making it much more practical and efficient than previously developed adsorbents. Popovs took inspiration from the chemistry of iron-hungry microorganisms.
Adsorption measurements were determined, by batch experiments of known amount of adsorbent, with 50 mL of aqueous MB solutions of known concentration, in a series of 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks.
Combination of high porosity and specific surface area adsorbent can be used to achieve maximum removal.
At higher temperature adsorbate are known to be less viscous and more mobile thus their molecules diffuses faster across the external boundary layer and in the internal pores of the adsorbent particle.
The selectivity of 1 and 2 toward Pd, Au, and Ag is higher than conventional adsorbents having thiocarbonyl groups such as thioamide [26-30, 46-52], thiourethane [32, 34, 36], and thiourea [11, 25, 53-59] including a commercial adsorbent QuadraPure[TM] TU (Aldrich) with the R-NH(C=S)N[H.sub.2] structure [61].
where [C.sub.0] and [C.sub.e] (mg/L) are the liquid-phase heavy metal concentrations initially and at equilibrium, respectively; V is the volume of the solution (L); and m is the mass of the dry adsorbent (g).
FESEM images of the adsorbent (HRMCAB) were taken by using HITACHI S3700N SEM instrument manufactured by HITACHI High-Technologies Ltd., India.
The amount of adsorption [q.sub.e] at equilibrium was defined as the amount of adsorbate per gram of adsorbent (in mg x [g.sup.-1]) and was calculated by the following equation:
where [C.sub.e] and [q.sub.e] refer to the concentration (mg/L) of metal ions and equilibrium adsorption capacity (mg/g) of the adsorbent under adsorption equilibrium, respectively.
Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides (such as methyl iodide) remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of currently used adsorbents.