adsorbate


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Related to adsorbate: adsorptive

ad·sorb·ate

(ad-sōr'bāt),
Any adsorbed substance.

adsorbate

(ad-sor′băt) [ adsorb + -ate]
Anything that is adsorbed.

ad·sorb·ate

(ad-sōr'bāt)
Any adsorbed substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The observed deviation may be attributed to the weakening of the attractive forces between adsorbent and adsorbate molecules or the possible alteration of active sites by increasing temperature.
Adsorption isotherms were obtained employing 10 mg of adsorbent and 10 mL of solutions with different concentrations of adsorbates (MB and phenol), which were placed in 20 mL vials and kept stirring at 100 rpm in a table Swivel for 24 hours at room temperature (25 [+ or -] 2 [degrees]C).
where, [q.sub.e] is the concentration of adsorbate taken up by the adsorbent (mg.[g.sup.-1]) at equilibrium conditions, [C.sub.o] is the initial concentration of the compound (mg.[L.sup.-1]), [C.sub.e] is the equilibrium concentration of the solution (mg.[L.sup.-1]), m is the mass of the adsorbent (g), and V is the solution volume (L).
The influent flow rate considerably affected the contact time between the adsorbate and adsorbent, which was comparatively longer with the decreased flow rate.
Figure 9 shows the adsorption capacity ([q.sub.e]) as a function of initial adsorbate concentration.
It can be seen from Table 1 that the adsorption processes of N[H.sub.2]-SH-GO/o-MWCNTs at different temperatures for [Pb.sup.2+] and phenol conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model ([R.sup.2] = 0.999): this indicated that the adsorption rate was positively correlated with the concentrations of the two adsorbates. As the temperature increased, the equilibrium adsorption capacities of N[H.sub.2]-SH-GO/o-MWCNTs for [Pb.sup.2+] and phenol gradually increased, implying that the increasing temperature promoted the adsorptions of the adsorbent.
where q is the amount of the adsorbate adsorbed (mg/g), t is the agitation time (min), and [k.sub.1] is Lagergren's pseudo-first-order rate constant ([min.sup.-1]).
In the Grand Canonical ensamble, working with the temperature T, the chemical potential [mu] and the system volume are used as fixed parameters, and as variable, the number N of molecules in the adsorbate. Adsorption was studied following the variation of quantities such as different surface coverage, internal energy, etc., which are calculated for nearest-neighbor attractive and repulsive lateral interactions.
The removal efficiency is influenced by various factors, such as solution concentration, solution pH, ionic strength, and nature of adsorbate, adsorbent modification procedure, physical properties (surface area, porosity) and the chemical nature of activated carbon [4].
This occurs when the dye molecules have a tendency to aggregate in aqueous solutions due to the hydrophobic character of their molecular structure, influencing the physisorption of molecules on the adsorbent, so the adsorbate may find diffusion resistance until it reaches the adsorbent site (Ghanadzadeh, Zeini, Kashef, & Moghadam, 2008).
Adsorbate and adsorbent experience certain attractive forces which bind them and these forces can be due to Van der Waals forces which are weak in nature or they may be due to chemical bonds which are strong in nature.
The adsorption nature of CABAA was studied by varying pH, equilibration time, sorbent dosage, temperature, and initial concentration of the adsorbate. The observations were presented in Figures 8-12 and Tables 2 and 3.