adsorb


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Related to adsorb: chromatography

adsorb

 [ad-sorb´]
to attract and retain other material on the surface; to conduct the process of adsorption.

ad·sorb

(ad-sōrb'), Do not confuse this word with absorb.
To take up by adsorption.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorb

/ad·sorb/ (ad-sorb´) to attract and retain other material on the surface; to conduct the process of adsorption.

Adsorb

To attract and hold molecules of other substances to a surface.

ad·sorb

(ad-sōrb')
To gather on or attract to a surface in a layer of condensation; to attach without covalent bonding.
Compare: absorb
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

ad·sorb

(ad-sōrb') Do not confuse this word with absorb.
To take up by adsorption.
[L. ad, to, + sorbeo, to suck in]

adsorb,

v to attract molecules of a substance to the surface of another solid substance.

adsorb

to attract and retain other material on the surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
On other side PE/F 108 with larger number of EO units (EO = 296) (Table 1-2) adsorbs less on a molar basis and occupies higher cross sectional area but the adsorbed layer thickness was also higher in PE/F 108 (thickness was calculated from rheology by Yasin et al.
These surface OH groups are polarised because of the high electronegativity of oxygen atom and can adsorb water molecules by forming hydrogen bonds.
A 100% deposition is reached when using cPAM, showing that cPAM indeed increases the deposition of AKD on fibres, despite the fact that cPAM does not adsorb on cationic AKD.
1 that nylon-6 adsorbs iodine from its solution and the amount of iodine adsorbed increased with the increase in concentration of iodine in the solution.
The scent stones are porous ceramic stones that adsorb liquid scent, then slowly release scent into your hunting area.
If the sand has a wide range of screen size distribution, the mold may be able to adsorb the expansion movement.
Parts of the polymer molecules adsorb at the carbon black surface.
Surface electrochemistry is the part of electrochemistry concerned with the details of what goes on at the electrode surface - in particular how molecules adsorb there and the reactions they undergo.
This left room on the tubing for new molecules to adsorb, to be altered, and then to be released into the solution, continuously reducing the potency of the solution.
As a rule of thumb, one ounce of desiccant can adsorb at least 3 gm of moisture vapor at 20% relative humidity, and at least 6 gm of moisture at 40% RH at 25 C.
This explains why several types of commercially available activated carbons do not adsorb gold cyanide at all, notwithstanding their high porosity and total surface area.