adrenergic blockade


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Related to adrenergic blockade: propranolol, Adrenergic receptors

blockade

 [blok-ād´]
1. in pharmacology, the blocking of the effect of a neurotransmitter or hormone by a drug.
2. in histochemistry, a chemical reaction that modifies certain chemical groups and blocks a specific staining method.
adrenergic blockade selective inhibition of the response to sympathetic impulses transmitted by epinephrine or norepinephrine at alpha or beta receptor sites of an effector organ or postganglionic adrenergic neuron. See also adrenergic blocking agent.
cholinergic blockade selective inhibition of cholinergic nerve impulses at autonomic ganglionic synapses, postganglionic parasympathetic effectors, or neuromuscular junctions. See also cholinergic blocking agent.
ganglionic blockade inhibition by drugs of nerve impulse transmission at autonomic ganglionic synapses; see also ganglionic blocking agent.
narcotic blockade inhibition of the euphoric effects of narcotic drugs by the use of other drugs, such as methadone, in the treatment of addiction.
neuromuscular blockade a failure in neuromuscular transmission that can be induced pharmacologically or result from any of various disturbances at the myoneural junction. See also neuromuscular blocking agent.
sympathetic blockade block of nerve impulse transmission between a preganglionic sympathetic fiber and the ganglion cell.

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik blok-ād')
Selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).

ad·re·ner·gic block·ade

(ad'rĕ-nĕr'jik blok-ād')
Selective inhibition by a drug of the responses of effector cells to adrenergic sympathetic nerve impulses (sympatholytic) and to epinephrine and related amines (adrenolytic).