corticosteroid

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corticosteroid

 [kor″tĭ-ko-ster´oid]
any of the hormones produced by the adrenal cortex; also, their synthetic equivalents. Called also adrenocortical hormone and adrenocorticoid. All the hormones are steroids having similar chemical structures, but quite different physiologic effects. Generally they are divided into glucocorticoids (cortisol, cortisone, and corticosterone), mineralocorticoids (aldosterone and desoxycorticosterone, and also corticosterone) and androgens.

Patients who must take exogenous adrenal corticosteroids to supplement a deficit in endogenous cortisol or as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer should be thoroughly instructed in self-medication. Their needs are somewhat similar to those of the insulin-dependent diabetic patient. They should know the prescribed dosage and basic therapeutic action of the oral corticosteroid preparation they are taking and should be aware of the importance of taking the medication at the same time every day. The medication should never be discontinued abruptly for any reason. It is advisable that the patient carry an extra prescription when traveling, in case the supply is used up before returning home. These patients also need to wear some form of medical identification so that all health care professionals with whom they come in contact will know that they are receiving hormones of this kind. This includes dentists, oral surgeons, emergency department personnel, and others who might not be familiar with the patient's medical history.

cor·ti·co·ste·roid

(kōr'ti-kō-stĕr'oyd),
A steroid produced by the adrenal cortex (that is, adrenal corticoid); a corticoid containing a steroid.
Synonym(s): adrenocorticoid, corticoid (3) , cortin

corticosteroid

(kôr′tĭ-kō-stĕr′oid′,-stîr′-)
n.
Any of the steroid hormones produced by the adrenal cortex or their synthetic equivalents, including the glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, and the mineralocorticoids, such as aldosterone. Also called adrenocorticosteroid.

corticosteroid

Clinical pharmacology Any of the steroids elaborated by the adrenal cortex–excluding the sex hormones of adrenal origin in response to the release of ACTH by the pituitary gland, to any of their synthetic equivalents or to angiotensin II; corticosteroids are used to manage arthropathies, inflammation, CA

cor·ti·co·ste·roid

(kōr'ti-kō-ster'oyd)
A steroid produced by the cortex of the suprarenal gland (i.e., adrenal corticoid); a corticoid containing a steroid.
Synonym(s): corticoid (3) .

corticosteroid

a steroid hormone of the adrenal cortex.

Corticosteroid

A class of drugs based on hormones formed in the adrenal gland, used to reduce inflammation. They increase the likelihood of hyperinfection syndrome in patients with threadworm infection.

antiinflammatory drug 

A drug which inhibits or suppresses most inflammatory responses of an allergic, bacterial, traumatic or anaphylactic origin, as well as being immunosuppressant. They include the corticosteroids (e.g. betamethasone, dexamethasone, fluorometholone, hydrocortisone acetate, loteprednol etabonate, prednisolone, rimexolone, triamcinolone). They are sometimes combined with an antibiotic drug (e.g. betamethasone combined with neomycin or sulfacetamide, dexamethasone combined with neomycin or polymyxin B). Corticosteroids have side effects, such as enhancing the activity of herpes simplex virus, fungal overgrowth, raising intraocular pressure or cataract formation.There are other antiinflammatory drugs that are non-steroidal (NSAID) and have little toxicity. They act mainly by blocking prostaglandin synthesis. These include diclofenac sodium, flurbiprofen sodium, indomethacin, ketorolac, nepafenac and oxyphenbutazone. See immunosuppressants; steroid.

cor·ti·co·ste·roid

(kōr'ti-kō-ster'oyd)
A steroid produced by the cortex of the suprarenal gland.

Patient discussion about corticosteroid

Q. I received a corticosteroid injection in my left knne th A.M. Knee is all stiff & swollen. Is this normal?

A. actually you might have already had an arthritis in your knee before, then your doctor injected you with a corticosteroid into the affected joint. usually you will feel better (less pain) in your affected joint. if the symptoms don't improve then I suggest you to go see your specialist for further advise and treatment.

More discussions about corticosteroid
References in periodicals archive ?
procumbens applied intraperitoneally in rats has an inhibitory effect on the acute inflammatory response independent of the activity of adrenal corticosteroids.