adoptive immunotherapy


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a·dop·tive im·mu·no·ther·a·py

passive transfer of immunity from an immune donor through inoculation of sensitized lymphocytes, or antibodies in serum or gamma globulin.

adoptive immunotherapy

n.
A form of immunotherapy used in the treatment of cancer and certain viral infections in which lymphocytes taken from a patient are stimulated, activated, and infused back into the patient.

Adoptive Immunotherapy

A form of passive immunisation in which sensitised cells or serum are transferred to an immunologically naive or lymphocyte-depleted recipient—e.g., for managing cancer, as in the use of IL-2/LAK cells.
About 10% of patients with terminal renal cell carcinoma and melanoma achieve partial or complete remission with LAK/IL-2; some response to LAK cells may occur in colorectal carcinoma and Hodgkin lymphoma; the effects may be dose-dependent, non-MHC-restricted, and require simultaneous high-dose IL-2.

a·dop·tive im·mu·no·ther·a·py

(ă-dop'tiv im'yū-nō-thār'ă-pē)
Passive transfer of immunity from an immune donor through inoculation of sensitized lymphocytes, transfer factor, immune RNA, or antibodies in serum or gamma globulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Japanese study compared the effect of adoptive immunotherapy on 150 liver cancer patients.
Martin Pule as well as being a senior Lecturer in UCL, holds an honorary consultant post as a clinical hematologist in the UCL Hospital (UCLH) and runs a laboratory research program in chimeric antigen receptor design and adoptive immunotherapy.
In this capacity, he directed the development and documentation of a closed-system, large-scale process for preparing, culturing, harvesting and shipping of patient T-cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy protocols.
Adoptive immunotherapy is a process in which researchers remove a small amount of blood from the patient and isolate the very small number of CTLs specific for the disease present in the patient.
Transfer of cells expressing receptors engineered to recognize specific disease-related antigens may increase the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy approaches to treating a variety of diseases.
We believe these studies indicate that adoptive immunotherapy using lymph node cells that are activated and expanded in the laboratory in short-term cultures can regulate the course of retroviral infection," said Pierre L.
Adoptive immunotherapy trials may get underway as early as next year.