adoption

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adoption

[ədop′shən]
Etymology: L, adoptere, to choose
a selection and inclusion in an established relationship or a choice of treatment protocol.

Adoption

The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under age 18, typically due to infertility; 8,000 babies/year enter the US adoption pool, most from underdeveloped countries; about 2% of children < age 18 in the US are adopted.
Health profile Adoptees comprise 5% of children in psychotherapy, 6–9% of those with learning disabilities, 10–15% of those in residential treatment or psychiatric hospitals.
Medical problems in international adoptees
• Infections Giardia lamblia, Trichuris trichiura, Blastocystis hominis, tuberculosis, HBV, chronic diarrhoea, poor hygiene
• Medical problems Neurologic, haematologic, renal, metabolic
• Psychological Sensory deprivation and/or physical abuse by care-givers
• Nutrition Malnutrition, rickets

adoption

Social medicine The act of lawfully assuming the parental rights and responsibilities of another person, usually a child under the age of 18; the care and nurturing of a child by a non-blood-related adult who assumes the roles, rights, and obligations of a natural parent; 2% of children < age 18–US are adopted–± 1 million. See Cooperative adoption, Designated adoption, Independent adoption, Infant adoption, Informal adoption, Open adoption, Relative adoption, Semiadoption, Simple adoption, Traditional adoption, Transracial adoption, Wrongful adoption, Zygote adoption.

adoption

1. of alien young. Individual dams of all species may adopt strange neonates, and some ewes will even attempt to poach from others, but special measures have to be taken in most cases to foster alien young. Sows are probably the easiest to deceive. Queens will accept foster kittens if they are within about 2 weeks of the age of their own kittens. Reluctant ewes may accept strange lambs only if they are rubbed with secretions from their own.
2. also used in reference to the placing of stray or otherwise unwanted dogs and cats into ownership, as stray animals obtained from an animal shelter.
References in periodicals archive ?
INTERRACIAL INTIMACIES: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption by Randall Kennedy Pantheon Books, $30.
These developments have implications for intercountry adoption, because they shape understandings of good practice amongst adoption agents and legislators, and because it is widely accepted that equivalent standards and practices should apply to all adoptions.
Congress must continue to work towards policy that helps make adoption a reality for more foster youth.
The shelter cares for more than 5,000 homeless pets each year and conducts adoptions through its main shelter, as well as at two satellite adoption centers that opened earlier this year.
immigration law and sought to promote a smooth transition for adoptions already in process.
Abrazo is always ready to help expectant mothers (as well as parents placing toddlers, children and sibling groups who are already born,) and the agency welcomes the interest of prospective adoptive couples from across the US (except NY,) who have documented infertility or an interest in special needs adoptions.
CCAI was created in 2001 by the bipartisan, bicameral Congressional Coalition on Adoption to raise Congressional and public awareness about the issue of adoption.
They first looked into adoption when an injury became a potential risk to pregnancy.
A Child for Keeps: The History of Adoption in England, 1918-45.
Shannon told the meeting that the board was working on administrative arrangements for adoptions from Bulgaria, South Africa and Thailand, though they were not yet finalised.