adopted person


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to adopted person: Adopted child

Adopted Person

A person who has been legally adopted by one or two parents.

adopted person

Adoptee Social medicine A person who has been legally adopted by one or two parents. See Adoption.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many transracially adopted persons (whether adopted domestically or internationally) lose a connection to their original culture and racial/ethnic group.
(98) Section 474.060 proclaims, "[F]or purposes of intestate succession, a relationship of parent and child must be established to determine succession by, through, or from a person, an adopted person is the child of an adopting parent and not of the natural parents." (99)
Similar to the absence of a formal and reliable counting system to capture the prevalence of transracial adoptions, theories about racial identity development for transracially adopted people have not captured the whole of the adopted person's experience.
For social-scientific support of these claims, see Triseliotis, "Identity Formation and the Adopted Person Revisited," 88-89; and D.M.
Florida courts have never addressed the question of whether virtual adoption confers upon the virtually adopted person eligibility to be appointed as personal representative of the estate.
Nevertheless, almost every adopted person has been asked, "Have you ever met your real parents." There is a cottage industry that believes that adopted people cannot have healthy identities without knowledge of their genetic roots and without contact with birthparents.
Q AS an adopted person, I feel vulnerable when employers ask for my full birth certificate as proof of my identity as I don't have a passport.
The Adoption Mystique is uncompromising in its view that adoption should be a process that considers the rights of the adoptee over the wishes of the birth parents or adoptive parents in instances where no compromise is possible, examines bias against adoptees in the media and society, and debunks the myth that an adopted person is sundered of ties to their heritage, or that they should just "get over" the need to search for their birth record information.
Similarly there is a rash of self-help guides written with the prospective adoptive parent in mind or written for the adopted person searching for his/her birth family.
The need to have answers to questions like these are what motivates an adopted person to search for their origins.
The most important aspect is that the final decision will rest with the adopted person. From start to finish, the case will need sensitive handling by the professionals involved.