adjuvant analgesic

Adjuvant Analgesic

A generic term for a medication (e.g., antidepressants, anticonvulsants) which is not designed to manage pain, but which has effects that can help reduce the need for designated analgesics. Adjuvant analgesics are reportedly of use in managing neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and other pain syndromes. In contrast to non-opioid analgesics, adjuvant analgesics require a doctor’s prescription. 
Examples Baclofen, gabapentin, ketamine, phloroglucinol, tramadol.
Pain management An ancillary agent with independent or additive analgesic properties, which allows a decreased in the amount of analgesics needed to relieve symptoms that compromise the quality of life in patients with CA, AIDS, and other dread disease.

adjuvant analgesic

Pain management An ancillary agent with independent or additive analgesic properties, which allows a ↓ in the amount of analgesics needed to relieve symptoms in Pts with CA, AIDS, and other dread disease
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, adding an adjuvant analgesic is an alternative to prolong the analgesic duration and to decrease the potential risk of side effects of local anaesthetics by reducing the dose of local anaesthetics.
It covers delivery, assessment and monitoring, the pharmacology of opioids and local anesthetics, nonopioids and adjuvant analgesic agents, systemic routes of opioid administration, patient-controlled analgesia, epidural and intrathecal analgesia, other regional and local analgesia, nonpharmacological therapies, acute neuropathic and persistent postacute pain and its treatment, nonsurgical acute pain, more complex patients like older and opioid-tolerant patients, and opioid analgesia after discharge from a hospital (a new chapter).
Therefore adjuvant analgesic strategy is an alternative to prolong the analgesic duration, to decrease the potential risk of side effects of local anesthetics by reducing the dose of local anesthetics Many adjuvants have been added in the effort to prolong the duration of local anesthetics like epinephrine, Butorphanol tartrate, dexamethasone, tramadol, Buprenorphine, verapamil, methylprednisolone, Clonidine, dexmedetomidine.
he selection of an adjuvant analgesic is often based on patient comorbidities and tolerability.
21-24) The studies investigating adjuvant analgesics in neuropathic pain are generally placebo-controlled with no comparison to other adjuvant analgesic therapy.
morphine, codeine, and pethidine), and adjuvant analgesics (e.
Adjuvant analgesics are medications whose primary indication is something other than pain, but act as an analgesic for some conditions.
Adjuvant analgesics include antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain.
These adjuvant analgesics combat central sensitization, a condition that occurs when the central nervous system remains in a persistent state of pain reactivity even after an initial injury is healed.
The physiological evidence supports the inclusion of medication previously considered as coanalgesics or adjuvant analgesics as primary analgesics.
Dr Kuritzky reviews the adjuvant analgesics commonly used, focusing on how to initiate therapy based on patient characteristics, as well as to modify therapy based on patient response.
Mild to moderate cases also may require adjuvant analgesics, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants.