adjunctive psychotherapy

adjunctive psychotherapy

a form of psychotherapy that concentrates on improving general mental and physical well-being without trying to resolve basic emotional problems. Some kinds of adjunctive psychotherapy are music therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and recreational therapy.
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While bipolar disorder guidelines recommend maintenance pharmacotherapy and adjunctive psychotherapy, the authors say, "tailored psychosocial interventions have not yet been developed for this population.
Adjunctive psychotherapy can reduce the risk of relapse and improve functioning.
Adjunctive psychotherapy for bipolar disorder: state of the evidence-Am J Psychiatry.
Suicide attempts in patients with bipolar I disorder during acute and maintenance phases of intensive treatment with pharmacotherapy and adjunctive psychotherapy Am J Psychiatry.
Recent research shows that there is a significant need for adjunctive psychotherapy to supplement and optimize the benefits of medication, Researchers and clinicians recognize that quality of life outcomes are at least as important as clinical outcomes to successful treatment of bipolar disorder A growing body of literature indicates that psychotherapeutic interventions benefit bipolar clients and have the potential to significantly improve their psychosocial functioning and decrease the substantial social costs of the illness.
In some cases, adjunctive psychotherapy is helpful in reaching key emotional factors.
There is also evidence that, like drug therapy, adjunctive psychotherapy is most effective when applied early.
VIENNA -- Preliminary experience with electrical deep brain stimulation for refractory disabling obsessive-compulsive disorder indicates that while the treatment often results in an extraordinary reduction in symptoms, adjunctive psychotherapy is indispensable, Dr.
Adherence difficulties and treatment resistance are not the only indications for adjunctive psychotherapy.
Adjunctive psychotherapy is not common, she said, because the disorder is seen as primarily biologically driven and because psychotherapists "aren't keen about taking on manic and hypomanic patients.
described interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as "a disorder-specific adjunctive psychotherapy for patients with bipolar disorder" at the Fifth International Conference on Bipolar Disorder.