adjunct


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adjunct

 [ad´junkt]
an accessory or auxiliary agent or measure.

adjunct

[ad′jungkt]
Etymology: L, adjungere, to join
(in health care) an additional substance, treatment, or procedure used for increasing the efficacy or safety of the primary substance, treatment, or procedure or for facilitating its performance. adjunctive, adj.

adjunct

A thing joined or added to another thing, which is not an essential part thereof—e.g., radiation therapy is an important adjunct to surgery and may represent appropriate adjuvant therapy.

adjunct

Medtalk A thing joined or added to another thing but which is not an essential part thereof–eg, RT is an important adjunct to surgery and may represent appropriate adjuvant therapy

adjunct (aj´ungkt),

n a drug or other substance that serves a supplemental purpose in therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
When it comes to valuing adjunct faculty, the issue goes beyond compensation," says Jim Ostrow, vice president for academic affairs at Lasell College in the greater Boston area.
Elmhurst College spokeswoman Desiree Chen, however, said the college never filed to seek a religious exemption because adjuncts withdrew their petition to the labor relations board before a hearing scheduled for Nov.
Communication, interpersonal, and organizational skills were prevalent in the listed job requirements, and previous teaching was preferred for virtually all adjunct positions.
Community colleges should make an effort to connect with their adjunct faculty as well.
Certain qualities strengthen your resume for adjunct positions when they become available, including:
Using adjunct faculty enables our campuses to be flexible and responsive based on student demand for various classes," he said.
The work of Adjunct Action Network, the outreach arm of the Service Employees International Union, offers promise.
We re proud of the adjuncts for sticking together during this drawn-out process, and our union hopes to sit down at the table with Duquesne s administration to begin bargaining as soon as possible, said USW International President Leo W.
The research examining the usage of adjunct faculty seems to characterize them in conflicting ways.
Townsend (2003) proposes that when adjunct faculty encounter low salaries and conflicts with their full-time employment responsibilities, they risk becoming less attentive to their teaching responsibilities.
Unlike full professors, most adjuncts earn just a few thousand dollars per class, with scant benefits and little job security.
During the semester, consider holding regular adjunct faculty professional-development sessions, as well as open help and networking opportunities.