adipocere


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ad·i·po·cere

(ad'i-pō-sēr),
A fatty substance of waxy consistency derived from dead animal tissues (for example, a corpse) that forms in anerobic conditions.
Synonym(s): grave wax, lipocere
[adipo- + L. cera, wax]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

adipocere

(ăd′ə-pō-sîr′)
n.
A brown, fatty, waxlike substance that forms on dead animal tissues in response to moisture.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Adipocere

A form of decomposition in which subcutaneous tissue is converted to a hardened cast of waxy/greasy fat, which is seen in unembalmed bodies entombed a year or more in cold wet ground—or cold acidic water. Moisture is often present at the onset and initially some warmth. The process may be triggered by Clostridium perfringens which, as producers of lecithinase, facilitate hydrolysis and hydrogenation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ad·i·po·cere

(ad'i-pō-sēr)
A fatty substance of waxy consistency into which dead animal tissues (e.g., those of a corpse) are sometimes converted when kept from the air under certain conditions of temperature.
Synonym(s): lipocere.
[adipo- + L. cera, wax]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

adipocere

A wax-like substance, consisting mainly of fatty acids, into which the soft tissues of a dead body, buried in moist earth, are converted.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called Soap Lady is largely made of adipocere, a waxy, soap-like substance that is produced when body fat undergoes an unusual process called saponification.
The so-called Soap Lady is largely made of adipocere, a waxy soap-like substance that is produced when body fat undergoes an unusual process called saponification.
The cadavers had been mummified through a natural process in which body fat is converted into a waxy substance called adipocere. Specific environmental conditions must exist for this transformation to occur.
For example, the radiographs revealed pins, probably used to fasten a burial shroud, imbedded in the adipocere. The pins were recovered and, based on the shape of the pinhead, it was determined that they were manufactured after 1824.
The high speed screens also met the primary goal of identifying the location of artifacts embedded in the adipocere and assessing the condition of the skeleton.
"It's called adipocere and is the result of a chemical reaction.
The butter has changed to white and is now adipocere, which is essentially animal fat, the same sort of substance that is found on well-preserved bodies of people or animals found in the bog.