adhesive capsulitis


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capsulitis

 [kap″su-li´tis]
inflammation of a capsule, such as that of the lens or joint.
adhesive capsulitis adhesive inflammation between the joint capsule and the peripheral articular cartilage of the shoulder, with obliteration of the subdeltoid bursa; it is characterized by increasing pain, stiffness, and limitation of motion. There are three stages to the condition: the painful stage (3 to 8 months long); the adhesive stage (4 to 6 months long); and the recovery stage (1 to 3 months long). Sometimes popularly called by the misleading term frozen shoulder.

ad·he·sive cap·su·li·tis

a condition in which joint motion becomes restricted because of inflammatory thickening of the capsule; a common cause of shoulder stiffness.
Synonym(s): frozen shoulder

bursitis chronica subdeltoidea

(1) Calcific tendonitis; calcific tendinitis.
(2) Frozen shoulder, see there (formally, adhesive capsulitis).
A shoulder with incapacitating pain due to bursitis and inflammation due to 1º or 2º osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, cuff tear arthropathy and the clinically similar ‘Milwaukee shoulder,’ postmastectomy, avascular necrosis, calcific tendonitis and tearing of the rotator cuff muscles

adhesive capsulitis

Orthopedics A condition caused by prolonged immobility of the shoulder joint Clinical Shoulder is painful, tender, ↓ passive and active ROM Management Physical therapy, corticosteroid injection; surgery if unresponsive. See Range of motion.

ad·he·sive cap·su·li·tis

(ad-hē'siv kap'sŭ-lī'tis)
A condition with limitation of motion in a joint due to inflammatory thickening of the capsule, a common cause of stiffness in the shoulder.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study conducted by Tighe and Oaklay in 2008, prevalence of diabetes was found to be 38.6% in the patients with adhesive capsulitis, also the 32.95% study participants were found to be pre-diabetics.
Pain and limited movement and resultant loss of labor force and impaired quality of life have led individuals to seek for rapid and effective treatment modality for adhesive capsulitis. In the treatment, conservative approaches and surgical treatment, if conservative measures failed, are recommended.
Manual therapy and exercise for adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder).
Conclusion: The use of intra-articular corticosteroid injection in shoulder joint potentially offers a significantly greater clinical improvement in pain relief over the use of supervised physiotherapy in the management of patients suffering from adhesive capsulitis.
(2) However, some of the patients may still experience pain, and may develop adhesive capsulitis and shoulder subluxation years after the diagnosis was made.
Saccomanni, "Inflammation and shoulder pain--A perspective on rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, and osteoarthritis: Conservative treatment," Clinical Rheumatology, vol.
JESS requires thin K (Kirschner)-wires, easy to assemble couplings, and offers a stable construct, [5] thereby allowing early movements to these group of patients who are very prone to adhesive capsulitis. Although there are no long-term studies to compare the results of JESS with other established modalities of treatment, the initial results seem promising, offering an easy, safe, effective, and economical alternative for the treatment of the proximal humerus fractures.
A Frozen shoulder, or adhesive capsulitis, is a chronic inflammation of the tissue around the shoulder joint--it can seem like arthritis because the symptoms (pain and restricted mobility) are similar to arthritis.
Although the precise parthenogenesis of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (frozen shoulder) is unclear, fibrotic, inflammatory, and chondrogenic processes of the joint capsule are described as potential pathomechanisms [1,2].
Other diseases include amyotrophy, osteoporosis and increased fracture risk, carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis of shoulder, trigger finger and limited joint mobility.- Like all other chronic diseases, musculoskeletal diseases impact quality of life negatively.
(25) According to Patten and Hillel, shoulder syndrome consists of SAN palsy associated with adhesive capsulitis of the glenohumeral joint capsule.