adherence


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Related to adherence: schedule adherence

ad·her·ence

(ad-hēr'ĕnts),
1. The act or quality of sticking to something.
See also: adhesion.
2. The extent to which a patient continues an agreed-on mode of treatment without close supervision. Compare: compliance (2), maintenance.
[L. adhaereo, to stick to]

adherence

(ăd-hîr′əns, -hĕr′-)
n.
1. The process or condition of adhering; adhesion.
2. The extent to which a patient continues an agreed-upon mode of treatment under limited supervision when faced with conflicting demands.

Adherence

The sticking of “A” to “B”.

ad·her·ence

(ad-hēr'ĕns)
1. The act or quality of sticking to something.
See also: adhesion
2. The extent to which a patient complies with the prescribed treatment under limited supervision.
Compare: compliance (2) , maintenance
[L. adhaereo, to stick to]

ad·her·ence

(ad-hēr'ĕns)
1. Act or quality of sticking to something.
2. Extent to which a patient continues an agreed-on mode of treatment without close supervision.
Compare: compliance, maintenance
[L. adhaereo, to stick to]
References in periodicals archive ?
Lower adherence was significantly associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease.
Conclusion: Counselling has the potential to increase patient knowledge regarding medication use, and active pharmacist-physician collaboration can improve medication adherence.
Adherence to dietary and fluid restrictions is difficult.
(13) Additionally, factors such as cognitive impairment, (14) low health literacy, (15) poor eyesight, physical disability, and musculoskeletal issues/lack of dexterity (3) can lead to inhaler incompetence and, thus, poor adherence. Moreover, difficulty in engaging with PCPs, daily fluctuations in symptoms, overuse of rescue medications, use of multiple inhalers, poor inhaler technique, and poor understanding of COPD also contribute to suboptimal adherence.
Adherence, as used in chronic disorders, was defined by the World Health Organization as the extent to which a person's behavior with respect to taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes corresponds with recommendations from a healthcare provider.
The authors assessed the effect of buprenorphine treatment on patient adherence to five therapeutic classes: antilipids, antipsychotics, antiepileptics, antidiabetics, and antidepressants.
There is an urgent need to identify the contributing factors towards non adherence and the ways and means to deal with those.
This even involves the different genders with adherence to the treatment being different in different genders6.
Nursing involvement and perspective in CPAP adherence intervention may highlight nursing's contribution to OSA issues and therefore can provide a positive impact on patients' overall health.