adenosarcoma

(redirected from adenosarcomas)
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Related to adenosarcomas: adenocarcinoma

adenosarcoma

 [ad″ĕ-no-sahr-ko´mah]
adenoma blended with sarcoma.

ad·e·no·sar·co·ma

(ad'ĕ-nō-sar-kō'mă),
A malignant neoplasm arising simultaneously or consecutively in mesodermal tissue and glandular epithelium of the same part.

adenosarcoma

/ad·e·no·sar·co·ma/ (-sahr-ko´mah) a mixed tumor composed of both glandular and sarcomatous elements.

adenosarcoma

[ad′ənōsärkō′mə] pl. adenosarcomas, adenosarcomata
Etymology: Gk, aden + sarx, fleshoma
a mixed malignant glandular tumor of the soft tissues of the body. It contains both glandular and sarcomatous elements.

adenosarcoma

A mixed tumour composed of benign, neoplastic glandular elements and sarcomatous, often low-grade, stromal elements; some arise in a background of tamoxifen therapy or radiation therapy. Most arise in the uterus; extrauterine sites include ovaries, pelvic tissue, intestinal serosa.

Clinical findings
Abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, an abdominal mass or vaginal discharge.

ad·e·no·sar·co·ma

(ad'ĕ-nō-sahr-kō'mă)
A malignant neoplasm arising simultaneously or consecutively in mesodermal tissue and glandular epithelium of the same part.

adenosarcoma

adenoma blended with sarcoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although uncommon, adenosarcoma affects women of a broad age range.
The prognosis of adenosarcoma greatly depends on stage and the presence of sarcomatous overgrowth.
Histologically, adenosarcoma is composed of benign-appearing epithelium and malignant stroma.
Not uncommonly, adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth may demonstrate low- to intermediate-grade atypia with a myxoid appearance (Figure 6).
The differential diagnosis of adenosarcoma is broad and consists predominantly of tumors that also have a biphasic (epithelial and mesenchymal) appearance.
Fascicular growth of the stromal component in adenosarcoma is unusual.
As the name implies, both elements of these neoplasms are malignant, but adenosarcoma can demonstrate cytologic atypia in the epithelial component; thus, the distinction from a small carcinoma can be difficult.
If entrapped glands are present, it can mimic adenosarcoma.
Low-grade ESS may resemble adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth, particularly if glandular elements and/ or entrapped benign endometrial glands are present.
The immunohistochemical profile varies, but these tumors are generally nonreactive for CD10, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor, in contrast to adenosarcoma.
Leiomyosarcoma may uncommonly entrap benign endometrial glands but does not demonstrate features characteristic for adenosarcoma.
One study (13) did not identify any ovarian metastases in patients who underwent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for uterine adenosarcoma.