adenoids


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Related to adenoids: adenoidectomy

ad·e·noid

(ad'ĕ-noyd), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation adnoid.
1. Glandlike; of glandular appearance. Synonym(s): adeniform
2. Epithelial and lymphatic unencapsulated structure located on the posterior wall of the nasopharynx. It undergoes absolute and relative enlargement during childhood and regresses during puberty. Inflammatory and physiologic enlargement is associated with otitis media, nasal obstruction, sinusitis, and obstructive sleep apnea.
[adeno- + G. eidos, appearance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Adenoids

(1) Adenoid glands, pharyngeal tonsil Lymphoid tissue that forms a prominence on the wall of the pharyngeal recess of the nasopharynx.
(2) A popular term for adenoidal hypertrophy, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

adenoids

Anatomy
1. Adenoid glands, pharyngeal tonsil Lymphoid tissue that forms a prominence on the wall of the pharyngeal recess of the nasopharynx.
2. A popular term for adenoidal hypertrophy, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ad·e·noids

(ad'ĕ-noydz)
1. A normal collection of unencapsulated lymphoid tissue in the nasopharynx. Also called pharyngeal tonsils.
2. Common terminology for the large (normal) pharyngeal tonsils of children.
[G. adēn, gland, + eidos, resemblance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

adenoids

Collections of overgrown gland-like tissue, present on the back wall of the nose above the tonsils in children, which shrivel and disappear in adolescence or early adult life. The adenoids contain LYMPHOCYTES and are part of the body's defence (immune) system.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Adenoids

Common name for the pharyngeal tonsils, which are lymph masses in the wall of the air passageway (pharynx) just behind the nose.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ad·e·noids

(ad'ĕ-noydz)
1. A normal collection of unencapsulated lymphoid tissue in the nasopharynx. Also called pharyngeal tonsils.
2. Common terminology for the large pharyngeal tonsils of children.
[G. adēn, gland, + -eidos, resemblance]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about adenoids

Q. When should the tonsils and/or adenoids should be removed?

A. Currently the tonsillectomy is recommended in the presence of 6 episodes of throat infection (Group A strep pharyngitis) in one year or 3-4 episodes in each of 2years. Adenoidectomy may be recommended when tympanostomy tube surgery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tympanostomy_tube) failed to prevent ear infection.

Another thing to consider is the presence of oral breathing - the constant use of the mouth for breathing in small children may lead to malformation of the facial bones that would necessitate more extensive surgeries later in life.

More discussions about adenoids
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References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 117 consecutive pediatric patients were included in this prospective, double-blind, controlled clinical study on the hemostatic efficacy of hydrogen peroxide irrigation for bleeding control in the surgery of adenoid tissue.
Objective: To find out the frequency of adenoid hypertrophy among adult patients with nasal obstruction.
Because tonsils and adenoids may shrink over time, the troubles are temporary for some children.
The adenoids and tonsils act as a first line of defence, helping to recognise airborne pathogens like bacteria and viruses, and begin the immune response to clear them from the body.
The presence of biofilms on the surface of adenoid tissue has been established and numerous studies have shown a correlation between the presence of biofilms on the adenoid and the occurrence of chronic upper respiratory tract infections.
Wang, "Regrowth of the adenoids after adenoidectomy down to the pharyngobasilar fascial surface," The Journal of Laryngology & Otology, vol.
We should emphasize that bacterial detection was widely different between adenoids and palatine tonsils in all patient groups.
Not surprisingly, we found evidence of microbial DNA on all adenoids. The relative abundance of microbial DNA for the common pathogens associated with AOM such as S.
However, nasoendoscopy showed enlarged adenoids obstructing the choanae with thick secretions accumulating in the nose, compatible with Grade 4 adenoid hypertrophy.
Majority of study population (53.8%) had Grade III adenoids (Enlarged adenoids filling from 2/3rd of vertical portion of choanae to nearly complete obstruction).
In either case an ENT surgeon might recommend removing the adenoids together with the tonsils to improve breathing, or remove the adenoids when inserting grommets to help with the treatment of glue ear.
We also determined relative expression levels of NF-?B p65 in the isolated epithelial cells of adenoids by RT-qPCR.