adenocarcinoid

adenocarcinoid

A general term for neuroendocrine neoplasms that differ from classical carcinoids; because the term can be applied to both goblet cell carcinoids and tubular carcinoids, which have different appearances and clinical behaviours, use of the term is discouraged.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crypt cell carcinoma of the appendix (so-called adenocarcinoid tumor).
Krukenberg tumor from an occult appendiceal adenocarcinoid: a case report and review of the literature.
These entities are usually carcinoid tumors, mucinous cystadenocarcinomas, colonic adenocarcinomas, and adenocarcinoid tumors [6].
Although most discussions about appendiceal cancers have revolved around carcinoid tumors historically, incidences of the noncarcinoid subtypes have been found to be higher as a whole, with rates per 1 million people per year of 1.3 for mucinous adenocarcinoma, 0.95 for adenocarcinoma, 0.5 for adenocarcinoid (goblet cell), and 0.15 for signet ring cell tumors (4).
KEY WORDS: Goblet cell carcinoid, Adenocarcinoid, Small-bowel neoplasms, Vermiform Appendix.
Combined adenocarcinoid and mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix: a case report.
As such, they have been classified, along with other neoplasms that show both neuroendocrine and glandular differentiation, as adenocarcinoid tumors, a term that includes biologically diverse neoplasms such as tubular carcinoid tumor and mixed carcinoid-adenocarcinoma.
Surgical treatment of appendiceal adenocarcinoid (goblet cell carcinoid).
Appendiceal GCC, also called mucinous carcinoid, adenocarcinoid, and crypt cell carcinoma, is rare and demonstrates characteristic histologic features of both adenocarcinoma and carcinoid tumor.
Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix as a distinct entity was first described in 1974.[1] Dual endocrine and glandular differentiation has led to confusion in the nomenclature (adenocarcinoid,[2] crypt cell carcinoma,[3] and mucinous carcinoid[4]) and management of such lesions.