adductor magnus


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Related to adductor magnus: Pectineus, adductor brevis, adductor longus

adductor magnus

the long, heavy triangular muscle of the medial aspect of the thigh. The adductor magnus acts to adduct the thigh. The proximal portion acts to rotate the thigh medially and flex it on the hip; the distal portion acts to extend the thigh and rotate it laterally. Compare adductor brevis, adductor longus, gracilis, pectineus.

Adductor Magnus

A hip/upper thigh muscle.
Action Adducts, extends thigh
Nerve Obturator, sciatic
Origin Ischial tuberosity, ischiopubic ramus
Insertion Linea aspera, adductor tubercle of femur

adductor magnus

medial thigh muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
The adductor magnus branch of the obturator muscular nerve branches (Fig.
The NEP of the adductor magnus muscle was selected for localization measurements and identified as follows: L'/L x 100 % = 22.
Further, we found adductor magnus to be the third most active muscle, in the absence of the prime mover.
Gluteus medius and adductor magnus induced the largest COM accelerations in the ML dimension.
The muscle groups most active in driving the system COM in the right and left directions were the right adductor magnus and right gluteus medius, respectively.
The adductor muscles of the medial compartment of the thigh are arranged in three layers: i) the superficial layer consisting of pectineus and adductor longus muscles, ii) the middle layer represented by the adductor brevis muscle, and iii) the deep layer formed by the obturator externus and adductor magnus muscles.
Once the posterior division of the obturator nerve entered the thigh, it descended deep to the pectineus and the adductor brevis, within the fascial layer overlying the obturator externus and the proximal part of the adductor magnus muscles.
0 in adductor magnus (AM) and gluteus maximus (GM), while the scores were 1.
Additionally constraining the various elements of the abdominals, hamstrings, and posterior portion of the adductor magnus to have equal activations (cases 3-5) showed decreasing performance, especially with the constrained activation of the abdominals.
As for hamstring benefit (determined by the percentage of feasible postures when the gluteus maximus was excluded), we found that the adductor magnus provided the most benefit, followed by the semimembranosus, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus.
Model simulations indicated that the required abduction moments were produced almost entirely by gluteus medius and hip adduction moments were produced almost entirely by adductor magnus.
These muscles were medial gastrocnemius for plantar flexion, tibialis anterior for dorsiflexion, vastus intermedius for knee extension, semimembranosus for knee flexion, adductor magnus for hip adduction, gluteus medius for hip abduction, gluteus maximus for hip extension, and erector spinae for trunk pitch and roll.