adduction

(redirected from adduce)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to adduce: adduce evidence

adduction

 [ah-duk´shun]
the act of adducting; the state of being adducted.
Adduction versus abduction of arm. From Chabner, 1996.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with abduction. In lecturing and dictation, some physicians pronounce the word "A D duction" to avoid ambiguity.
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement. Compare: abduction.

Adduction

The movement of a limb or other body part, usually on a transverse plane, toward the axis or midline—medial plane—of the body.

ad·duc·tion

(ă-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits) or midline of the body.
2. Monocular rotation (duction) of the eye toward the nose.
3. A position resulting from such movement.
Compare: abduction

adduction

A movement towards the centre line of the body. Muscles which adduct are called adductors. The term derives from the Latin ad , to and ducere , to draw. Compare ABDUCTION.

adduction 

Rotation of an eye towards the midline (Fig. A6). See duction; paralysis of the third nerve; Duane's syndrome.
Fig. A6 Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eyeenlarge picture
Fig. A6  Abduction of the right eye. Adduction of the left eye

ad·duc·tion

(Ad) (ă-dŭk'shŭn)
Movement of a body part toward the median plane (of the body, in the case of limbs; of the hand or foot, in the case of digits).
References in periodicals archive ?
A provision that expressly places the onus of establishing reasonable grounds on the corporation that made a representation with respect to any future matter was replaced with one that simply requires the representor to adduce evidence of reasonable grounds to avoid being deemed not to have had reasonable grounds for making the representation.
1.14.1: Cur qui paedicat semel, aut semel irrimat, auctor, although he adduces as well Priap.
343-4, adduces only one parallel that does not concern Rufinus himself: it refers to a centaur (V.
She then adduces additional material to explain how circumstances altered chains of events and outcomes, to separate fact from myth, and to arrange a singular occurrence within a broader frame.
A third piece adduces evidence that "la lezione di Polidoro [da Caravaggio] impresse tracce profonde sul repertorio figurativo del nostro artista" (393), while a fourth makes patent Salviati's participation in what its author terms the "officina farnesiana" of mid-sixteenth-century Rome.
The author adduces some elements of Frege's philosophy that elucidate why he saw extensions as natural candidates for paradigmatic cases of logical objects.
Yet he adduces no evidence to contradict this point.
He adduces this as a mitigating circumstance for the massacre but does not draw out how that designation fit into the larger, genocidal strategy of the American war effort.
The evidence that Brzezinski adduces on the rise of nationalist tensions does little to buttress his audacious claim that only a global confederation will halt a slide into anarchy.
But by the end of his exposition, Wittreich adduces startling evidence that the figure of Samson becomes subject to a new hermeneutic in the latter half of the seventeenth century: one that calls on readers (with Herbert Thorndike) "to advise, whether sinful actions, and not according to God's own law, were fit to figure Christ" (175).
First the author adduces evidence for the standard view from Maimonides's positions on perfected and imperfected human beings, and from his discussions of immortality, morality, providence, prophecy, and the distinction between humans and animals.
Yet, as Sullivan insists, merchants were surely interested in the theater; apart from the evidence she adduces (including the city companies' sponsorship of entertainments, 124), one might also note Thomas Mun's elaborate reference to Dr.