address

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address

Informatics
The alphanumeric code for the location of point of communication on the Internet or an intranet.
 
Molecular biology
A site on a chromosome with a ‘character set’ of ≥ 16 base pairs which, at 416, makes that address unique, and unlikely to occur more than once on the genome.

Professional communication
A speech, oration or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may be didactic in nature.

address

pronounced uh-DRESS Professional communication A speech, oration, or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may have a didactic end. See Keynote address, National Library of Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the clause-final then simply conveys a temporal meaning and denotes that the action takes place at the moment indicated by the addressor, but does not perform a sequential cohesive function.
The second sociopragmatic factor which can be employed to analyse the relationship between addressor and addressee is the politeness principle.
addressor, the concepts being used, and that which is being talked
By contrast the lynched black bodies are excluded from (literally outside of) the official or state-sanctioned dialogical relationship of addressor and addressee, which the postcard's inscription illustrates.
As markers of emotional distance, they point to the addressor's subjectivity and have a special importance in argumentative and narrative texts in relation to the notion of point of view (cf.
There is a parallel risk on the part of the addressor as well.
Moreover, as Li points out, many Chinese often use certain cues to indicate that the person with whom they are interacting is considered a part of the in-group (also indicating that the addressee has certain roles and obligations to fulfill in relation to the addressor).
In response to her sarcastic portraits of the family, the narrator dissociates himself from Becky Sharp as a judge of human nature, and proceeds to generalize by way of analogy on the relations between addressor and audience.
In this context, we could extend our understanding of language games by means of an approach like that taken by Anthony Giddens - that agents make society but not under conditions of their own making - so that we arrive at a sense in which subjects are regarded not merely as the addressees of a language game or small narrative (Lyotard does suggest that the addressee "accepts" the call of the narrative and is in that sense its addressor) but as partial authors as well (that is, they do not "produce" society but through self-reflexivity they act to "reproduce" it).
This is why the addressor occupies a divided subject position: he recognizes that his position is constructed within ideology.
These instances are "what the phrase is about, the case, ta pragmata, which is its referent; what is signified about the case, the sense, der Sinn; that to which or addressed to which this is signified about the case, the addressee; that `through' which or in the name of which this is signified about the case, the addressor" (Lyotard, 25).