address

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address

Informatics
The alphanumeric code for the location of point of communication on the Internet or an intranet.
 
Molecular biology
A site on a chromosome with a ‘character set’ of ≥ 16 base pairs which, at 416, makes that address unique, and unlikely to occur more than once on the genome.

Professional communication
A speech, oration or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may be didactic in nature.

address

pronounced uh-DRESS Professional communication A speech, oration, or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may have a didactic end. See Keynote address, National Library of Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The conditional form in (12) suggests that the speaker is not actually giving advice but merely pondering what his advice would be if the addressee was involved in a negative situation.
In requests, mitigators are used to persuade the addressee into compliance by appealing to his willingness to help the speaker.
But there are other features of this sentence that Leech does not draw attention to, and that suggest that Pip is again (or still) speaking of things that he assumes are not news for the addressee within an assumed communicative relationship where complete understanding belongs at least as much with the addressee as with the speaker.
The speaker assumes in this rhetorical question that the addressee regrets his forgetfulness, his failure "to remember yet" (l.
Communicate in context, with every meeting and every memo containing both organizational elements and local elements, so that addressees know how the new information will affect them.
Onesimus is cast as an individual whose current value is distinctly different from his former (known) value, which was familiar to the addressees of the letter.
Analysts working from a normative pragmatic perspective view addressees as autonomous agents who are free to meet, ignore, or evade these forces, that is, to confront negative consequences or forego positive consequences.
In advertising, communication takes place in a context where cooperation between sender and addressee is not at all guaranteed and this factor hinders the communicative process.
Clark and Carlson claim that in such cases, when each hearer has an equal potential of being an addressee, the "equipotentiality principle" applies.
Where Yeats's approach toward his addressee is gentle and affectionate, Ronsard's approach is arrogant and critical.
Here seventeenth-century scholarly correspondence is discussed as a means of communication with detailed attention to style, tone, forms of address, contents, and quantity in the letter to suit the character of the addressee (227).
The poetic narrator speaks about the addressee of the poem as a literary construct, totally dependent on her.