additive

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additive

 [ad´ĭ-tiv]
1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another, such as to improve its appearance or increase its nutritive value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv),
1. A substance not naturally part of a material (for example, food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (for example, preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In metric studies (for example, genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation. Compare: synergism.

Additive

adjective
(1) See Additive effect
(2) Characterised by addition
noun A substance—e.g., a flavouring agent, preservative, vitamin or other substance—which is added to an active substance to improve appearance, texture, or increase shelf-life or nutritional value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
1. A substance not naturally a part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In quantitative studies (e.g., genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation.
Compare: synergism

additive

Any substance added to something, especially a food, in order to improve or preserve it. Additives are of economic and nutritional importance but some people may display allergic sensitivity to some of them.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
A substance not naturally part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
References in periodicals archive ?
Clariant: For the paints and coatings industry, specifically for manufacturers of architectural coatings and pigment preparations, Clariant provides a variety of performance additives including: APEO-free wetting agents, label-free dispersing agents, low VOC humectants, and specialty ingredients such as a sugar-based neutralizing agent, rheology improving stabilizers for biocide-free paints and silver biocides for the antimicrobial preservation.
The phytogenic feed additives feed additivesmarket is segmented into four parts based on the end-use type, packaging type, distribution channels, and geography.
The new rules also spell out the conditions under which additives may be used in food.
USDA certified-organic producers only use safe additives, like beet juice, to add a reddish color.
Company's On-Spec feeder for feeding additives and color is modularly designed with a stainless steel feed bin and machined parts for quick change of additives, easy maintenance and cleanout.
Food Standards Agency (FSA) question whether these results are relevant to the human consumption of these additives. "[The Lau study assumes] that both MSG and aspartame are absorbed one hundred percent in the gut, but [other studies] show that this does not seem to be the case," says FSA senior press officer Shaun Whelan.
Some examples of this coagulant concept being used in different parts of the industry include internal size promotion or fixation, efficiency gains for wet end starch and dry strength additives, optical whitener quenching, incoming water color removal, effluent neutralization prior to the clarifier, dual polymer retention systems, and drainage aids for save alls and forming fabrics.
Other researchers have suggested that changes in engine temperature or chemical interactions between the additive and metal surfaces trigger a lubricant's function.
Figure 4 shows castings produced without modifications to the molding sand (additives include predominately western bentonite and no carbonaceous additives).
additive usage, according to a recent study, was measured at 1.2 billion pounds in 2003, a value of $1.7 billion.
For starters, some see the linkup as further evidence that soy additives have come of age.
US demand for lubricant additives is forecast to increase less than one percent yearly to 1.9 billion pounds in 2004, valued at $1.7 billion.