additive

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additive

 [ad´ĭ-tiv]
1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another, such as to improve its appearance or increase its nutritive value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv),
1. A substance not naturally part of a material (for example, food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (for example, preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In metric studies (for example, genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation. Compare: synergism.

Additive

adjective
(1) See Additive effect
(2) Characterised by addition
noun A substance—e.g., a flavouring agent, preservative, vitamin or other substance—which is added to an active substance to improve appearance, texture, or increase shelf-life or nutritional value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
1. A substance not naturally a part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In quantitative studies (e.g., genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation.
Compare: synergism

additive

Any substance added to something, especially a food, in order to improve or preserve it. Additives are of economic and nutritional importance but some people may display allergic sensitivity to some of them.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
A substance not naturally part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
References in periodicals archive ?
Additive gene action was found to have main control in number of kernels per row and plant height while dominance was prevailing in 100-grain weight, seed yield, time to maturity, ear length and ear height in subjected maize genotypes (Konak et al., 1999; Aslam et al., 2015b).
The GCA is a measure of the additive gene action, while SCA is assumed a deviation from additivity.
The said trait was controlled by both additive and non-additive gene actions, however, due to prominent GCA the variable was inclined to additive gene action. In case of GCA effects for eight parental accessions, four genotypes revealed positive GCA effects, and being maximum in accession MYT120 (4.58) followed by MYT124 (2.27), MYT123 (1.58) and MYT009 (0.64) (Table 2).
([double dagger][double dagger]) Gene action was estimated by |d|l|a|:A (additive gene action) = 0 to 0.02, PD (partial dominance) = 0.21 to 0.80, D (dominance) = 0.81 to 1.20, and OD (over dominance <1.20.
Spike length dry biomass per plant at maturity grains per spike 1000-grain weight and grain yield per plant exhibited high narrow sense heritability due to the existence of additive gene action with partial dominance suggesting that these traits might be useful for the development of high temperature stress tolerant varieties by modified pedigree selection method.
Acquired thermal tolerance, as measured by MTS for this genetic sample, appears to be conditioned primarily by additive gene action. Other researchers also demonstrated the importance of additive gene effects in acquired thermal tolerance.
Additive gene action for this trait appeared to be expressed only under normal moisture level as revealed by the significance of D while these effects were absent in moisture stress and only non-additive effects H1 and H2 were significant.
If there was one allele for elevated palmitate and additive gene action was expressed, a 1:2:1 ratio would be expected for the three classes.
The small d/a ratios in Tables 4 and 5 indicated that additive gene action was most important for WI.
Furthermore, importance of non- additive gene action has also been observed in self- pollinated crops.
The observed phenotypic segregation among [F.sub.2] seeds satisfactorily fit a 1:14:1 ratio that would be expected for the segregation of two independent loci with additive gene action (Table 2).