additive

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additive

 [ad´ĭ-tiv]
1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another, such as to improve its appearance or increase its nutritive value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv),
1. A substance not naturally part of a material (for example, food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (for example, preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In metric studies (for example, genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation. Compare: synergism.

additive

[ad′itiv]
any substance added intentionally or indirectly that becomes a part of the food, pharmaceutical, or other product. Additives may be introduced in growing, processing, packaging, storage, or cooking or other final preparation for consumption.

Additive

adjective
(1) See Additive effect
(2) Characterised by addition
noun A substance—e.g., a flavouring agent, preservative, vitamin or other substance—which is added to an active substance to improve appearance, texture, or increase shelf-life or nutritional value.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
1. A substance not naturally a part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).
2. Tending to add or be added; denoting addition.
3. In quantitative studies (e.g., genetics, epidemiology, physiology, statistics), having the property that the total combined effect of two or more factors equals the sum of their individual effects in isolation.
Compare: synergism

additive

Any substance added to something, especially a food, in order to improve or preserve it. Additives are of economic and nutritional importance but some people may display allergic sensitivity to some of them.

ad·di·tive

(ad'i-tiv)
A substance not naturally part of a material (e.g., food) but deliberately added to fulfill some specific purpose (e.g., preservation).

additive,

n an ingredient added to a food, drug, or other preparation to produce a desired result, such as color or consistency, unrelated to the primary purpose of the preparation.

additive

1. characterized by addition.
2. a substance added to another to improve its appearance, increase its nutritive value, etc. See feed additive.

food additive
material added to food; includes preservatives, emulsifiers, stabilizers, acids, nonstick agents, humectants, firming agents, antifoaming agents, colorings and flavorings, solvents, and even nutritive materials such as minerals and vitamins.
additive gene action
1. total contribution made by all loci to a polygenic trait.
2. when the heterozygote is intermediate in phenotype between the two homozygotes, i.e. a lack of dominance.
additive genetic relationship
the degree of relationship (number of genes held in common) between two individuals neither of which is inbred; the minimum relationship is 0 and the maximum is 1.0.
additive genetic variance
variance attributed to the mean effect of substituting one allele for another at any given loci.
intramammary infusion additive
agents, e.g. anti-inflammatories, added to improve pharmacological efficacy.
additive relationship
see additive genetic relationship (above).
References in periodicals archive ?
Transgressive segregants with enhanced levels of resistance were obtained in the cross between the moderately susceptible cultivars PS 83 and Evans, indicating that there were different minor resistance genes with additive gene actions in the two parental lines (Cherif and Harrabi, 1990).
Additive gene action for most of the traits was noticed in upland cotton (Chinchane et al.
The GCA mean squares were greater in magnitude than RCA and SCA indicating preponderance of additive gene action for seed yield per plant.
The extension of the response half-life conditioned by epistasis represents a possible mechanism explaining results obtained in longterm selection experiments in which additive genetic variance and selection response fail to decline as would be predicted under additive gene action (see Weber and Diggins, 1990).
Additive gene action with partial dominance was observed for all the traitsboth temperature stress conditions suggesting that these traits might be useful for the evolution of thermo-tolerant hexaploid spring wheat varieties for hot irrigated dry climate by modified pedigree selection empirical breeding technique.
Most reports have emphasized the importance and prevalence of additive gene action (Bedov, 1985; Miller and Fick, 1997).
Both of the additive and non- additive gene actions were controlling ear height in maize as evident from the significance of D and H (H1 H2) variances.
The major alleles for palmitate exhibited primarily additive gene action in five crosses because there were no significant differences between the average palmitate content of the [F.
2] and backcross populations of alfalfa found partial dominance for conductivity (FI) and additive gene action for FG (Kohel and Davis, 1960; Perry et al.
The graphical representation of variance (Vr) and co-variance (Wr) proposed additive gene action with partial dominanceaction.
2] genotypes based on the model of two alleles at one locus with additive gene action.
2011) worked out general and specific combining ability for quantitative characters in sunflower and explained that the GCA variance was higher than the SCA variance for yield, head diameter and oil content and thus additive gene action was more important than non-additive gene action for these traits.