addition reaction

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addition reaction

A reaction in organic chemistry in which a single chemical is formed from two or more monomers or substances.
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as illustrated by the rales of consumption of the active hydrogen atoms of BTA via the competitive Michael addition reaction (corresponding to the term [K.sub.M] [B.sub.H] [M] in Eq.
Therefore, we showed the diastereoselective synthesis of S,S-2-methylsulfanyl-2-methylsulfinyl-1indanol (7) by reduction reaction using 2-methylsulfanyl-2-methylsulfinyl-1-indanone (9) optically enriched demonstrating the high efficiency of the sulfoxide group on the control of asymmetric induction in the carbonyl addition reaction.
When the reaction was performed using higher concentration solution (0.5 M) for the reaction mixture, only the isomerized trans product was formed in trace amounts with no addition reaction taking place in all three methods.
The Type I coagent is a very reactive monomer, favoring addition reactions leading to homopolymerization and subsequent grafting to polymer chains, through either direct addition reactions (unsaturated polymers) or through abstraction/coupling reactions with saturated or unsaturated polymer chains.
(9.) Mather, BD, Viswanathan, K, Miller, KM, Long, TE, "Michael Addition Reactions in Macromolecular Design for Emerging Technologies." Prog.
[3] "Related Pergamon Titles of Interest," in Conjugate Addition Reactions in Organic Synthesis, vol.
The extent of both combination and addition reactions will depend on the peroxide level, whereas only the extent of the addition reaction is affected by the diene type and content.
Isomerization versus Addition reactions of Maleic Acid and its Methyl Ester-A systematic study on the effect of Temperature, Concentration and Reagents/Catalysts Nagarajan Vasumathi, Ashley Casey and Jill Lott, Dept.
A high ROOH concentration therefore implies a high concentration of conjugated double bonds that are especially prone to radical addition reactions, because of the possibility of forming a relatively stable allylic radical.
His textbook looks at acid, bases, and nucleophiles; and substitution, elimination, and addition reactions. He includes answers and explanations for the chapter-end problems.