adaptive behavior


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behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.

a·dap·tive be·hav·ior

any behavior that enables an organism to adjust to a particular situation or environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
These results suggest that an intensive, short-term intervention was effective in improving adaptive behavior, emotional functioning, and sensory processing as reported by parents as well as by examiner-assessed motor performance.
Based on the results of this research, it is proposed that an effective method of conducting cognitive therapy to improve adaptive behavior be developed.
3) There is a negative relationship between the age of care taking training and adaptive behavior of female students.
Adaptive behavior assessment system II - manual (2nd ed.).
Where a firm responds to a partner's adaptive behavior with increased trust and cooperative norms, the relationship will be characterized by greater collaboration and mutuality.
Impairments in cognitive and adaptive behaviors as measured by MSEL and VABS were also associated with increased antibody levels.
The main aim of this article is to describe the genesis of the construct adaptive behavior, its relation with the idea of intellectual disability and to remark the importance of the adaptive behavior as criteria for the diagnosis of intellectual disability.
The accepted understanding of robust and adaptive behavior is gradually changing from being generated by isolated control mechanisms within organisms towards dynamical process occurring over multiple and distributed systemic components (sec [28][10]).
That study examined the relationships between ratings on the IAA for students with significant disabilities, corresponding scores on the general assessment, and ratings on two norm-referenced teacher rating scales: the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales (ACES; DiPerna & Elliott, 2000) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS; Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1985).
There are verbal ability tests, nonverbal ability tests, phonics tests, tests for memory, visual-motor ability, and adaptive behavior, along with more semi-structured interviews and observation checklists.

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