adaptive behavior


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behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.

a·dap·tive be·hav·ior

any behavior that enables an organism to adjust to a particular situation or environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) There is a negative relationship between three sub-scales of child rearing approaches and adaptive behavior of female students.
H4b: The greater the mediated power use by an actor in a dyad, the lower the supply chain partner's adaptive behavior.
The Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, 2nd Edition (VABS-II; Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2006) were designed to assess individuals with and without disabilities from birth to adulthood in four domains: communication, daily living, socialization, and motor skills.
The overall regression model explaining adaptive behavior (model 2) was statistically significant (p < .
This system of constraints allows further customization of the adaptive behavior to particular situations.
Adaptive behavior literature has regularly pointed to a definition provided by the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR) as the accepted standard.
Regarding adaptive behavior development rate, between-group analyses indicated that the rate of development both before and during intervention was not significantly different for the DTT and control groups.
As shown in Table 2, the range of adaptive behavior composite standard scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (Sparrow, Balla, Cicchetti, 1984) prior to intervention was 38 to 63 (M = 49.
Evolution of adaptive synapses: Robots with fast adaptive behavior in new environments.
This analysis was repeated for each risk and adaptive behavior reported by the preadolescent and then for each behavior reported by the parent.
This portrait often includes information on general and specific intellectual abilities, language competence (and, with bilingual children, language dominance), academic achievement, social and adaptive behaviors and skills, personality and temperament, and possibly vocational qualities (e.

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