adaptation syndrome


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Related to adaptation syndrome: local adaptation syndrome, Space adaptation syndrome

adaptation syndrome

(1) General adaptation syndrome, see there.
(2) Space adaptation syndrome, see there.

adaptation syndrome

The psychological and hormonal responses to acute stress, such as severe injury, or to prolonged stress. The immediate shock reaction, featuring release of cortisols and adrenaline, is followed by a phase of increasing adaptation to the injured state and then either by healing or by bodily decline.
References in periodicals archive ?
They just "looked sick." This observation may have been the first step in his recognition of "stress." He researched and described the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS), defined as the non-specific response of the body to any demands placed upon it.
This edition synthesizes research findings from the past 50 years; reflects the evolution and testing of various theoretical models from other disciplines, including the general adaptation syndrome, Transaction Model of Stress and Coping, and Allostasis and Allostatic Load Theory, and nursing models that have evolved from them.
Citation: The relationship between stressors and disturbing physiological processes was first established by Selye (1946) and explained with the General Adaptation Syndrome. The scientist theorized an association between stress and disease as a cause and effect phenomena, with stress causing diseases of adaptation (Selye, 1946).
Coming to an institution triggers an adaptation syndrome: need to accept the role of a resident, leave 'former' life and adapt to new (different) conditions.
An analogy to the energetic premise of the Disuse Syndrome is the General Adaptation Syndrome proposed by Selye 60 years ago (31).
This concept later evolved into GAS--General Adaptation Syndrome ,which was based upon the observation that stress significantly influences endocrine function through hypothalamus and anterior pitutary gland, leading to enlargement and increased function of adrenal cortex.
(3) He noted that this pattern of symptoms could be explained by what he later defined as the general adaptation syndrome that consists of three stages: the alarm reaction, the stage of resistance, and the stage of exhaustion.
We must first look at the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS) developed by Hans Selye.