acute skin failure

acute skin failure

Burn care Potentially fatal systemic consequences of skin damage, as occurs in extensive 2nd degree–deep partial and 3rd degree–full-thickness burns or in toxic epidermal necrolysis. See Toxic epidermal necrolysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Dermatological emergencies comprise diseases with severe alterations in structure and function of the skin, with some of them leading to acute skin failure that demands early diagnosis, hospitalization, careful monitoring and multidisciplinary intensive care to minimize the associated morbidity and mortality.
Dermatological emergencies; acute skin failure; dermatological intensive care unit (DICU).
Sudden severe alterations in the anatomy and physiology of skin consequent to some of the generalized dermatoses presenting as emergency situation, can lead to disabling complications eventuating in the potentially fatal condition of acute skin failure.4 With the availability of effective drugs, monitoring facilities and awareness of need for immediate care, there has been a significant decline in the fatality rate associated with dermatological emergencies.
Understanding the etiopathogenesis of various systemic complications of acute skin failure and their prompt management in ICU on lines similar to that of burns can salvage many lives.4 In this review, we describe major causes of dermatological emergencies, some of which lead to acute skin failure and outline the general management of acute skin failure in intensive care unit setting.
Management of acute skin failure: need of dermatological intensive care unit [4]
ICU in a skin department has now been recognized as a necessity due to a large number of extensive skin diseases eventuating into potentially fatal syndrome of 'acute skin failure'.
In conclusion, there is need of a separate ICU attached to a dermatology department to deal with expertise and urgency all types of dermatological and dermatosurgical practice related emergency situations, especially acute skin failure, in order to decrease mortality and morbidity.
Topics covered include cell injury and death; new antimicrobials; immunomodulators and biologics; acute skin failure; neonatal emergencies; necrotizing soft tissue and bacterial skin infections; viral, fungal, and parasitic diseases; stings, bites, and marine envenomations; drug, allergic, and immunological reactions; complications of dermatologic therapies; purpura and vasculitis; connective tissue disorders and their complications; skin signs of systemic infections and neoplastic and paraneoplastic diseases; sexually transmitted diseases; torture and self-inflicted dermatoses; environmental skin disorders; signs of poisoning; disaster planning; and catastrophes in cosmetic procedures.

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