acute pulmonary histoplasmosis

Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis

An acute upper respiratory tract infection caused by exposure to Histoplasma capsulatum spores, which are found in most parts of the world except the western US and Canada, Europe and western Asia.
Clinical findings In immune competent hosts, APH may present with mild flu-like symptoms. Immunoincompetent hosts may develop chest pain of varying intensity, chills, cough, dyspnoea, fever, muscle aches, musculoskeletal stiffness, lymphadenopathy, night sweats, rash, erythema nodosum, weight loss.
Risk factors Exposure to bird or bat droppings, caving, immune compromise—especially AIDS.
Management Usually self-limited; if therapy is required, amphotericin B, itraconazole.

acute pulmonary histoplasmosis

Infectious disease An acute URI caused by exposure to H capsulatum spores, which is usually accompanied by mild flu-like Sx. See Histoplasmosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human infections caused by Histoplasma capsulatum may present as acute pulmonary histoplasmosis, chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis, and progressive disseminated histoplasmosis.
Radiographic evidence of infection included pulmonary infiltrates, lesions, nodules, or cavitation; hilar or mediastinal lymphadenopathy; or unspecified findings indicating acute pulmonary histoplasmosis, as noted by the original authors.
This example highlights the nonspecific symptoms of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis (e.g., fever, cough, headache, fatigue, and chest pain), which can persist for weeks or months (1,29,30).
Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis occurs in previously healthy subjects, whereas chronic pulmonary histoplasmosis manifests itself in the presence of emphysematous air spaces and disseminated disease and usually occurs in patients with altered cellular immunity.
Heavier exposure may lead to an acute flulike or pneumonia-like illness (acute pulmonary histoplasmosis, acute blastomycosis, or acute coccidioidomycosis/ valley fever).
In general, testing of convalescent serum samples offers the highest sensitivity for subacute and chronic pulmonary disease, and antigen testing (i.e., a quantitative, second-generation EIA), appears to be one of the most sensitive tests for acute pulmonary histoplasmosis (8).
Rather, it is a reactive inflammatory process that occurs weeks to months following acute pulmonary histoplasmosis with infection of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the pediatrician explained.
Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis is a disease caused by Histoplasma capsulatum (HC), a dimorphic fungus commonly found in the United States in soil along the Mississippi and Ohio river valleys (Deepe 2000).
In this cluster of 4 cases, the index case-patient unequivocally experienced acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. Two other persons epidemiologically associated with the index case had compatible symptoms and positive serologic results, and thus can be considered probable case-patients.
To identify workers with symptomatic acute pulmonary histoplasmosis acquired during the 2004 outbreak, a cohort study was conducted among plant workers.
While most nonimmunocompromised patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis improve without treatment, persons with hypoxemia, diffuse pulmonary histoplasmosis, or severe illness requiring hospitalization may benefit from antifungal therapy mad, in some cases, corticosteroids (5).
Although this test is not sensitive for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis, the test is very specific.
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