actual

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actual

(ak′choo-ăl) [Fr. fr. L. actualis, active, practical]
Real, existent.
References in classic literature ?
And now that an angry unsympathetic little girl insisted obstinately that he was not as ill as he thought he was he actually felt as if she might be speaking the truth.
Actually the tears meant that a curious great relief had come to him.
Judge from this, what motives he had to run the risk which he actually ran.
Rebecca said she had long had some notion of the partiality with which Sir Pitt honoured her (for he was in the habit of making his feelings known in a very frank and unreserved manner) but, not to mention private reasons with which she would not for the present trouble Miss Crawley, Sir Pitt's age, station, and habits were such as to render a marriage quite impossible; and could a woman with any feeling of self-respect and any decency listen to proposals at such a moment, when the funeral of the lover's deceased wife had not actually taken place?
Well, then, in the first place, Rebecca gave way to some very sincere and touching regrets that a piece of marvellous good fortune should have been so near her, and she actually obliged to decline it.
Ma tante is ACTUALLY ANGRY that I should have refused him.
As things actually were at that moment, what course was he to take with the unhappy woman who was waiting to hear from him at the Scotch inn?
"My mind's made up; I'll write, and have done with it!" He sat down to his writing on the spot; actually finished the letter; another minute would have dispatched it to the post--and, in that minute, the maddening indecision took possession of him once more.
did actually for five seconds or so wish themselves dead.
I shall ere long paint to you as well as one can without canvas, something like the true form of the whale as he actually appears to the eye of the whaleman when in his own absolute body the whale is moored alongside the whale-ship so that he can be fairly stepped upon there.
Every part of it brought pain and humiliation, of some sort or other; but, compared with the evil to Harriet, all was light; and she would gladly have submitted to feel yet more mistaken more in errormore disgraced by misjudgment, than she actually was, could the effects of her blunders have been confined to herself.
"Here have I," said she, "actually talked poor Harriet into being very much attached to this man.