active surveillance


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Active Surveillance

Epidemiology Surveillance in which extra measures are taken to collect data and confirm diagnoses to ensure more complete reports for surveys and outbreak investigations. Active surveillance encompasses formal and informal communications.
Oncology Active waiting An approach to managing early prostate cancer (PC), which affords a window on its natural history, and is an ideal setting for identifying and evaluating biomarkers of PC behaviour. It is essentially watchful waiting with a protocol of serial digital rectal exams, measurement of PSA levels and re-biopsy at intervals.

active surveillance

Monitoring the health of a community by a public health agency that requests reports about specific diseases or conditions.
See also: surveillance
References in periodicals archive ?
"Our goal is not to reduce the number of patients choosing active surveillance; rather, the results of this study should increase awareness and efforts to ensure that active surveillance patients are monitored rigorously," he added.
Prostate cancer death of men treated with initial active surveillance: clinical and biochemical characteristics.
A key unmet clinical need in the detection of prostate cancer, and on the comprehensive characterization of supposed low risk lesions on active surveillance, has been our inability to visualize the cancer on standard imaging modalities.
Based on initial management, patients were divided in 3 groups: active surveillance, radiotherapy, and systemic treatment.
Active surveillance requires clear and uniform inclusion criteria.
Long-term follow-up of a large active surveillance cohort of patients with prostate cancer.
The article chosen to critique is "Potential Role of Active Surveillance in the Control of a Hospital-Wide Outbreak of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection".
This continued to drop over time with only 12.5% of patients remaining active surveillance culture positive for MRSA at 5 years after the original positive culture.
Key Words: Prostate cancer, active surveillance, prostate cancer treatment, decision-making, literature review, Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing (C-SHIP) model.
Results showed that active surveillance use was more than 30% higher in men who received the GPS test than in men who did not receive the genomic test.
The study included 7,637 men with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who initially underwent active surveillance and were followed for up to 12 years.