active labor


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ac·tive la·bor

contractions resulting in progressive effacement and dilation of the cervix.

active labor

Etymology: L, activus, active, labor, work
the normal progress of the birth process, including uterine contractions, full dilation of the cervix, and descent of the fetus into the birth canal (midpelvis).

ac·tive la·bor

(ak'tiv lā'bŏr)
Contractions resulting in progressive effacement and dilation of the cervix.
Compare: prodromal labor

active labor

Regular uterine contractions that result in increasing cervical dilation and descent of the presenting part. This encompasses the active phase of stage 1, as well as stages 2 and 3 of labor.
See also: labor
References in periodicals archive ?
2% women continued to have adequate uterine contractions despite discontinuing oxytocin, which, when compared to the aforementioned studies, supports the hypothesis that oxytocin can be stopped in active labor.
In our study, the length of interval from pre labor rupture of membranes to active labor was shorter in patients with induction group.
For those who had undergone cesarean delivery, the results showed no association between active labor and pelvic floor disorders.
The first section describes the passive and active labor market policies used in OECD countries.
At the same time the active labor market policies, esp.
Johansson (2003), "Employment, Mobility and Active Labor Market Programs", IFAU Working Paper, 2003:3, The Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluations, Uppsala.
Active labor is distinguished by more focused breathing, walking, and different positions.
To be eligible for the study, women had to be in active labor or to be at least 34 weeks pregnant.
The treatment consisted of intravenous infusions of magnesium sulfate, which successfully prevented active labor.
Shannon of Harvard Medical School, Boston, report that the number of adult visits to the CHED at Children's Hospital, Boston, grew from 443 in 1993 to 737 in 2001 in association with the implementation of Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) regulations (Pediatrics 111[6]: 1268-72, 2003).
There were times when 20 to 30 women were in active labor, some with high risk and complicated pregnancies, giving birth with very little care, some on cold, naked steel delivery room tables - of which there were few.
Under the federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, hospitals with emergency room services are required to treat anyone who requires care, including illegal aliens--but the act does not specify who is liable for the costs.

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