active immunity


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ac·quired im·mu·ni·ty

resistance resulting from previous exposure of an individual in question to an infectious agent or antigen; it may be active and specific, as a result of naturally acquired (apparent or inapparent) infection or intentional vaccination (artificial active immunity); or it may be passive, being acquired through transfer of antibodies from another person or from an animal, either naturally, as from mother to fetus, or by intentional inoculation (artificial passive immunity).

active immunity

n.
Immunity resulting from the development of antibodies in response to the presence of an antigen, as from vaccination or exposure to an infectious disease.

Active Immunity

The natural immune response to an antigen by infectious exposure or inoculation, resulting in the formation of specific antibodies and protection from subsequent infection by the same pathogen.

ac·quired im·mu·ni·ty

(ă-kwīrd' i-myū'ni-tē)
Resistance resulting from previous exposure of the individual in question to an infectious agent or antigen; it may be active, as a result of naturally acquired infection or vaccination; or passive, being acquired from transfer of antibodies from another person or from an animal, either from mother to fetus or by inoculation.

active immunity

Immunity to disease resulting from infection with the disease or immunization with a vaccine. In both cases there is active production of ANTIBODIES.

active immunity

see ANTIBODY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since active immunization is the gold standard for preventing HBV infection among the general population, induction of active immunity against HBV after OLT appeared to be an effective alternative to HBIG and nucleoside analogues.
By comparison, active immunity is longer-lasting and more effective than passive immunity due to the immunologic memory produced by the patient's own immune system.
Most of the vaccines work by generating so-called "active immunity." The research subject is injected with molecules designed both to mimic the drug and stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies.
MANILA, THE PHILIPPINES -- Acyclovir given 1-2 weeks after exposure to varicella-zoster virus allows the acquisition of active immunity while preventing clinical disease, Japanese researchers found in a small study.
Artifically acquired active immunity Protection from disease stimulated by intensional means such as a vaccine.
Undetermined and requiring study is whether active immunity might be protective through an anamnestic response.