acrylic resin

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a·cryl·ic res·in

a general term applied to a resinous material of the various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, for other dental restorations, and for trays.

resin

(rez'in) [L. resina, fr. Gr. rhetine, resin of the pine]
1. A natural, amorphous, nonvolatile, soft or solid exudation of plants. It is practically insoluble in water but dissolves in alcohol. See: rosin
2. Any of a class of solid or soft organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin. They are usually of high molecular weight and most are polymers. Included are polyvinyl, polyethylene, and polystyrene. These are combined with chemicals such as epoxides, plasticizers, pigments, fillers, and stabilizers to form plastics.

acrylic resin

Quick-cure resin.

anion-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cation-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cholestyramine resin

An ion-exchange resin used to treat itching associated with jaundice and elevated serum lipid levels. Side effects may include bloating and abdominal discomfort.

cold-cure resin

Quick-cure resin.

ion-exchange resin

An ionizable synthetic substance, which may be acid or basic, used accordingly to remove either acid or basic ions from solutions. Anion-exchange resins are used to absorb acid in the stomach, and cation-exchange resins are used to remove basic (alkaline) ions from solutions.

quick-cure resin

An autopolymer resin, used in many dental procedures, that can be polymerized by an activator and catalyst without applying external heat.
Synonym: acrylic resin; cold-cure resin; self-curing resin

self-curing resin

Quick-cure resin.

a·cryl·ic res·in

(ă-krilik rezin)
Resinous material of various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, dental restorations, and trays.
References in periodicals archive ?
To photocure commercial unsaturated polyester or polyester acrylate resins, 2,4-diiodo-6-butoxy-3-fluorone (DIBF) was utilized as the visible initiator at a concentration of 0.10 or 0.15 wt%.
The study was conducted by making variations of high and low [T.sub.g] urethane acrylate resins and blending them in five different ratios.
For this purpose, UPE acrylate resins containing different amounts of internal maleic and terminal acrylate unsaturation were synthesized.
The self-curing acrylate resins, typically incorporated at 20%-30%, do not affect ink flow and are suitable for use in ink formulations with different types of pigments.
Furthermore, if crude oil prices rise again, raw material costs for acrylate resins will rise as well.
A kinetic study of the ultrafast curing of water-based acrylate resins upon UV irradiation was conducted by means of infrared spectroscopy.
In acrylate resins like those used in photolithography, the carbon-carbon double bonds of the acrylate groups disappear as the monomer molecules are converted to crosslinked polymer.
The resin market is hardly a uniform business; within it, there are a wide variety of products, including hy-drocarbon and rosin-based resins for publications, acrylate resins for energy-curable inks and water-based acrylic, urethane, polyamide and nitrocellulose-based resins for different packaging applications.
The photoinitiated polymerization of acrylate resins is known to be strongly inhibited by oxygen which reacts rapidly with the initiator R* and polymer ([P*.sub.n]) radicals to generate inactive peroxy radicals:
Arkema is also present in Nansha with its Sartomer photocure acrylate resins plant.
announced it is increasing prices of its Radcure epoxy acrylate resins by $0.10 per pound for its undiluted grades, and by $0.06-$0.08 per pound for its diluted grades.