acrylamide


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acrylamide

(ă-kril'ă-mīd),
A carcinogen that forms in starchy foods cooked at high temperature (for example, fried potatoes, potato chips).

Acrylamide

Molecular biology A core material used to make polyacrylamide gels for electrophoretic separation of macromolecules.
Nutrition A substance found in increased concentrations in fried foods—e.g., crisps/potato chips, French fries—and regarded by the WHO as a probable human carcinogen.

acrylamide

Nutrition A substance found in ↑ concentrations in fried foods–eg, potato chips, French fries, and regarded by the WHO as a probable human carcinogen

a·cryl·a·mide

(ă-kril'ă-mīd)
A carcinogen that forms in starchy foods cooked at high temperature (e.g., fried potatoes, potato chips).

acrylamide

A substance used in the plastics industry that is toxic to nerve fibres. Inhalation of the vapour from the crystalline substance can cause nerve degeneration and permanent paralysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although french fries with lower acrylamide content were lighter than typical commercial fries, consumers may trade off sensory quality for perceived safety.
Toxicological effects of acrylamide on rat testicular gene expression profile.
According to European Union the acrylamide concentration was found high in processed foods like fried chips, potato chips, crispy bread, biscuits, breads and cereals [18].
Even some baby foods contain acrylamide, such as teething biscuits and crackers.
Acrylamide and its derivatives cause to damage glomerular, arteriolar and tubule interstitial area in the renal tissue (Fig.
For example, the FDA says that companies can lower acrylamide by adding asparaginase (an enzyme that breaks down asparagine), calcium, or other safe additives, or by processing at lower temperatures.
At the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Food Science Research Unit (FSRU) in Raleigh, North Carolina, scientists are working to reduce acrylamide, a known carcinogen, while helping to preserve health-promoting compounds in foods.
French fries contain acrylamide. The chemical poses a risk for several types of cancer in rodents.
This is in response to concerns about acrylamide - a known carcinogen produced when starchy foods, such as potatoes and bread, are subjected to temperatures in excess of 120C.
Humans have been eating acrylamide, a chemical that forms in some foods when they are exposed to high heat, for as long as we have been cooking, but it wasn't until 2002 that its presence in foods was discovered.
The National Swedish Food Administration detected elevated amounts of acrylamide in fried and oven-baked foods (Roach et al.