acropetal


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ac·rop·e·tal

(ă-krop'ĕ-tăl),
1. In a direction toward the summit.
2. Produced successively toward the apex, with the youngest conidium formed at the tip and the oldest at the base of a chain of conidia; pertaining to asexual spore production in fungi by successive budding of the distal spore in a spore chain.
[acro- + L. peto, to seek]

ac·rop·e·tal

(ă-krop'ĕ-tăl)
Developing from the base toward the apex.
[acro- + L. peto, to seek]

acropetal

  1. (of plant structures, e.g. leaves and flowers) produced one after another from the base of the stem to the apex.
  2. (of substances, e.g. water) moving from the base of a plant to the apex.

ac·rop·e·tal

(ă-krop'ĕ-tăl)
In a direction toward the summit.
[acro- + L. peto, to seek]
References in periodicals archive ?
2009), the acropetal initiation and differentiation of primary branches produces homogenized and non- homogenized inflorescences; while species with basipetal differentiation of the primary branches (regardless of whether initiation is acropetal or basipetal) always show homogenized inflorescences.
2009) have correlated the acropetal initiation of primary branches with the presence of a determinate symmetry type; and the basipetal initiation of primary branches with an unstable simetry, that is, the existence of different types of symmetry among inflorescences within one species.
Order of flower initiation generally differs in determinate and indeterminate inflorescences: basipetal in the former; acropetal in the latter.
As used here, these are capitula that initiate flowers and undergo development and anthesis in a more or less strict acropetal or centripetal pattern.
However triggered, floral initiation on the meristem of the primary capitulum proceeds in a more or less acropetal or centripetal fashion.
Acropetal initiation is not as clear-cut a phenomenon in heterogamous or radiate capitula.
It must be stressed that these deviations from the strictly acropetal pattern of events occur only when more than one type of flower is present on the primary capitulum.
The initiation, ontogeny, and subsequent anthesis of the secondary capitulum is homologous to that of a synflorescence or collection of primary capitula (Classen-Bockhoff, 1992; Harris, 1994; Kunze, 1969; Rauh & Reznik, 1953); that is, the individual or primary capitula are initiated in an acropetal sequence and develop acropetally, but they then undergo anthesis basipetally.