acropathy

acropathy

 [ah-krop´ah-the]
any disease of the limbs.

id·i·o·path·ic hy·per·tro·phic os·te·o·ar·throp·a·thy

osteoarthropathy not associated with pulmonary or other progressive lesions, which may occur alone (acropathy) or as part of the syndrome of pachydermoperiostosis.

acropathy

(1) A nonspecific term for any disease, injury, tumour or inflammation affecting the extremities. 
(2) Familial clubbed fingers, described as an autosomal dominant condition MIM 119900.
(3) Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy (formerly, ulcerative mutilating acropathy).
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical identification is done by the finding of a mutilating acropathy with a severe, distally pronounced impairment of all sensory qualities (Light touch sensation, position sense and vibratory perception, as well as pain and temperature perception).
Thyroid acropathy is an unusual involvement of autoimmune thyroid disorders (Hashimoto, Graves, etc.), which often appears after a long-lasting thyroid disease.
In conventional radiographic examinations, joint involvement and periosteal bone changes were symmetrical in both the hands and were consistent with classical thyroid acropathy. On the other hand, toe involvement was unilateral.
In literature, there are a few acropathy case studies reporting that acropathy develops independent of thyroid hormones without classical radiological findings, and it is not accompanied by the findings of ophthalmopathy and dermopathy (1-4).
Thyroid acropathy is generally among the rare complications that develop because of autoimmune thyroid disorders (such as Hashimoto and Graves).
Soft tissue swelling, clubbing, and periosteal bone changes, particularly in the fingers, toes, and lower extremities, can be observed in patients with thyroid acropathy. Their conventional radiographies are characterized with the periosteal reaction with symmetrical involvement in the long bones of the lower extremities, fingers, and toes.