acromioclavicular joint injury

(redirected from acromioclavicular joint dislocation)

acromioclavicular joint injury

A disruption of the articulation formed between the acromion process and the clavicle, which may be accompanied by tearing of ligaments.
 
Sports involved
Football, wrestling, equestrianism, hockey.
 
Clinical findings
Pain at the top of the shoulder, decreased range of movement, splinting with arm held to the side; severe injury may be accompanied by a “lump” on the top of the shoulder.
 
Grading
Grade I—partial tear of the acromioclavicular ligament.
Grade II—complete tear of the acromioclavicular ligament and partial tear of the coracoclavicular ligament, accompanied by subluxation or partial displacement.
Grade III—complete disruption of the joint.

Management
Ice may alleviate pain and inflammation; grades I and II: use of a sling for pain; grade III may require open reduction and internal fixation, though there may be some disinclination to perform this manouevre for a non-break.

Mechanism
Direct downward blow to the tip of the shoulder.

acromioclavicular joint injury

Orthopedics A disruption of the articulation formed between the acromion process and the clavicle, which may be accompanied by tearing of ligaments Sports Football, wrestling, equestrianism, hockey Clinical Pain at the top of the shoulder, ↓ ROM, splinting with arm held to the side; severe ASs may be accompanied by a 'lump' on the top of the shoulder Management Ice is nice; grade I, II, sling for pain; grade III controversial-some advocate open reduction and internal fixation; others say, 'if it ain't (really) broke, don't fix it.'
References in periodicals archive ?
Rao, "Combined acromioclavicular joint dislocation and coracoid avulsion in an adult," BMJ Case Reports, 2015.
KEY WORDS: AO/ASIF claviclehook plate Distal clavicle fracture Acromioclavicular joint dislocation Therapeutic effect.
Methods: One hundred patients with distal clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations who were admitted in our hospital from January 2012 to January 2013 were selected as the study subjects.
Biomechanical evaluation of minimally invasive repairs for complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation.
The anatomic reconstruction of acromioclavicular joint dislocations using 2 TightRope devices: a biomechanical study.
Objective: Type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation is treated by various methods including hook plate, pinning and fixiation by a screw.
Methodology: In this study, 50 patients with type III acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation aged 20 to 40 years old who referred to Emam Khomeini and Razi Hospital of Ahvaz Iran, between the years of 1998 and 2010 were enrolled.
In addition to the open technique, Lafosse and coworkers described an all-arthroscopic technique for coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction by ligamentoplasty after acute or chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation.
Surgical management of complete Tossy III acromioclavicular joint dislocation with the Bosworth screw or the Wolter plate.
Biomechanical rationale for development of anatomical reconstructions of coracoclavicular ligaments after complete acromioclavicular joint dislocations.
Biomechanical function of surgical procedures for acromioclavicular joint dislocations.
This report highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for associated uncommon injuries, such as coracoid fractures, when evaluating and treating common injuries such as clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations.