acromioclavicular dislocation

acromioclavicular dislocation

The joint between the acromium process of scapula and the distal end of the clavicle, the location of most shoulder separations, which are particularly common in collision sports—e.g., ice hockey, rugby, American football, and Aussie-rules football, but not uncommon in swimming, horseback riding, mountain biking, and snow skiing—due either to direct trauma to the shoulder or falling on outstretched hands.
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Surgical versus conservative interventions for treating acromioclavicular dislocation of the shoulder in adults.
Conservative or surgical treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation.
shoulder dislocation, elbow dislocation, radio-ulnar dislocation, acromioclavicular dislocation, etc.
Colwill, "Combined acromioclavicular dislocation with coracoclavicular ligament disruption and coracoid process fracture, " The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
Radiography of acromioclavicular dislocation and associated injuries.
1) Acromioclavicular dislocation is classified as per criteria given by Rockwood et al.
Johnson, "Case report and review of the literature: avulsion fracture of the coracoid associated with acromioclavicular dislocation," Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, vol.
The effect analysis of 55 cases of type III acromioclavicular dislocation treated surgically.
Coracoid process transfer for acromioclavicular dislocation.
Type II: Glenoid neck fracture with clavicular fracture and acromioclavicular dislocation.
Acromioclavicular dislocation was the most commonly associated injury and was evident in 39 of their patients.
Acromioclavicular dislocations, also known as shoulder separations, are common injuries and are classified into six types (Fig.