acriflavine


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Related to acriflavine: acriflavine hydrochloride

ac·ri·fla·vine

(ak'ri-flā'vin), [C.I. 46000]
An acridine dye, formerly used as a topical and urinary antiseptic, and also used as one of Kasten fluorescent Schiff reagents to reveal polysaccharides and DNA.

acriflavine

(ăk′rə-flā′vēn′, -vĭn)
n.
A brown or orange powder, C14H14N3Cl, derived from acridine and formerly used as a topical antiseptic.

acriflavine

An orange powder derived from acridine and used, in solution, as an antiseptic for skin cleansing and wound irrigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Motta, "Acriflavine treatment promotes dyskinetoplasty in Trypanosoma cruzi as revealed by ultrastructural analysis," Parasitology, vol.
albicans 18.0 [+ or -] 0.5 6.0 Microorganism [Cu[([L.sub.2]) Acriflavine .sub.2]] E.
Furthermore, acriflavine is not approved for use in France and in many other countries.
CLE with topical acriflavine was firstly used to identify Hp infection in a patient in 2005, and the bacterium which uptakes acriflavine ex vivo was seen as bright dots [116].
In this study, trifluralin, acriflavine, saponin and plumbagin were used in alternate combination of two drugs against L.
Researchers have found that acriflavine has the previously unknown ability to halt the growth of new blood vessels.
Baird-Parker medium supplemented with acriflavine, polymyxins and sulphonamide for the selective isolation of Staphylococcus aureus from heavily contaminated materials.
Before the bacteria were stained with 0.20 [micro]m filtered acriflavine solution (Bergstrom et al., 1986), the samples were clarified with thiosulphate crystals.
The Nor A efflux pump is responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance (Yoshida et al., 1990); Qac A is responsible for acriflavine and ethidium bromide resistance (Littlejohn et al., 1992) and Tet (K) and Msr (A) transporters are specific to tetracycline and macrolide efflux (Renau et al., 1999).
For abdominal operations, the patient was prepped by shaving around the pubic area and painting the abdomen yellow with acriflavine in spirit.
When used in conjunction with intravenous contrast agents such as fluorescein, acriflavine, and cresyl violet, the microscope allows endoscopists to visualize the abnormal cell growth characteristic of cancerous lesions.
Acriflavine is an orange coloured dye, derivative of coal tar & traditionally used as a topical antiseptic.