acriflavine


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Related to acriflavine: acriflavine hydrochloride

ac·ri·fla·vine

(ak'ri-flā'vin), [C.I. 46000]
An acridine dye, formerly used as a topical and urinary antiseptic, and also used as one of Kasten fluorescent Schiff reagents to reveal polysaccharides and DNA.

acriflavine

(ăk′rə-flā′vēn′, -vĭn)
n.
A brown or orange powder, C14H14N3Cl, derived from acridine and formerly used as a topical antiseptic.

acriflavine

An orange powder derived from acridine and used, in solution, as an antiseptic for skin cleansing and wound irrigation.

acriflavine

an antiseptic dye used for topical application; average strength is 1:1000 to 1:8000 solution.

acriflavine hydrochloride
used as a solution for local antiseptics. Acid in reaction and slightly irritant.
References in periodicals archive ?
To measure the bacteriostatic effects, viable colony count (VCC) was performed separately on Acriflavine treated and untreated broth cultures of both donor and recipient.
In first part nothing was added and in the rest 3 parts, Acriflavine was added to achieve final concentrations of 50 pg/mL, 25 [micro]g/mL, and 12.
Viable Colony Count (VCC) performed on Acriflavine treated and untreated cultures of donor and recipient (Bacteriostatic experiment) revealed a decrease in colony counts in Acriflavine treated sets.
Using sterile toothpick, a random isolated colony was sampled from spread plate of Acriflavine treated donor strain, and streaked in duplicate onto the same corresponding grid numbers on both plates.
Acriflavine is a well-known DNA-intercalating agent which interferes with proper DNA propagation.
Trifluralin, acriflavine and saponin extract were purchased from Sigma.
Reference drugs included sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam; Sigma), amphotericin B (Fungizone; Squib), pentamidine isethionate (Sigma), trifluralin (Sigma) and acriflavine (Sigma).
BALB/c mice-treated using acriflavine and trifluralin produced significantly larger lesion sizes than those being treated using saponin and plumbagin.
2 mg/kg dose of saponin, plumbagin, trifluralin and acriflavine resulted in 97.
Acriflavine stops blood vessel growth by inhibiting the function of the protein hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, which was discovered by Semenza's team in 1992.
They then tested each of the more than 3,000 drugs in the John Hopkins drug library and found that Acriflavine did turn out the light and further studies confirmed that it was binding directly to HIF-1.
Liu hopes that acriflavine can one day be incorporated into chemotherapy cocktails, one drug among many that help fight cancer.