acridines


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to acridines: acridine dyes

acridines

dyes which can bind to NUCLEIC ACIDS and insert themselves between the adjacent BASES, a process called intercalation. Acridines can inhibit DNA and RNA synthesis and can cause FRAMESHIFT mutations. They are used as MUTAGENS, for example, proflavine (proflavin), as ANTIMICROBIALS, for example acriflavine (acriflavin), and as fluorescent stains for nucleic acids, for example acridine orange. They may also be used to eliminate PLASMIDS from CELLS of BACTERIA, a process known as curing.
References in periodicals archive ?
nitriles > anilines > pyridines > quinolines > acridines > indoles > carbazoles
The first group, spanning clades A to F, mostly comprises members of the Gomphocerinae; the single exception, clade E, consists of a melange of acridines and gomphocerines.
One could regard the acridines within clade E as "peg-less gomphocerines"-a possibility, given Otte's (1981) statement concerning the relative ease with which stridulatory pegs can be lost over evolutionary time.
This behavior indicated that although different substitution on benzene ring increases the zone of inhibition but no overall effect on the antimicrobial activity which may be originated by the hydrazides group incorporated with main acridine molecule.
Lee, Improved Power Efficiency in Deep Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using an Acridine Core Based Hole Transport Material, Org.
Duplex DNA, on the other hand, prefers the acridine conjugate with the longest linker length, and RNA has the highest affinity for the conjugate with an intermediate linker length.
Keywords: Cynarasaponins; Euglena gracilis; Ofloxacin; Acridine orange; Antimutagenicity
cardunculus against the genotoxicity of ofloxacin and acridine orange (AO) in the Euglena gracilis assay.