acrasia


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acrasia

An obsolete term for a lack of self-control; disinhibition.
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But if we break down that word power a little, question the terms of the syllogism, redefine it with a lot less violence, then Guyon's sparing of Acrasia can be something completely different.
In D2, Price offers a "traditional" (286) interpretation of Aristotle on acrasia (especially NE 1146b-1147b).
After the Palmer with his "vertuous staffe" transforms them back into men, they still "vnmanly looke" and "stared ghastly," either for "inward shame" or for "wrath" to see Acrasia taken prisoner.
Hughes's impressively comprehensive essay, "Spenser's Acrasia and the Circe of the Renaissance.
They accommodate the phenomena of acrasia in one way or another.
In Chapter 1, 'Spenser and the politics of music', Wells seems concerned with finding greater complexity and ambiguity in the allegory of Acrasia and the Bower of Bliss than C.
He relishes the idea of rehabilitating Acrasia and Archimago as |authentic' Spenserian creations.
Acrasia, the Circelike mistress of the Bower of Bliss.
Sir Guyon and the Palmer discover the dying Amavia, who tells them how her dead husband, Sir Mordant, had succumbed to the wiles of the enchantress Acrasia (Intemperance), who lives in the Bower of Bliss on the Wandering Island.
Acrasia tempts his victims with images that imitate life (II, XII), Busirane projects them into his allegories after imprisoning Amoret (III, XII), Archimago frames a spirit of "liquid air" into a perfect resemblance of Una, one that is perfectly "lively" and able to ravish "the weaker sense," and that he sends to Redcrosse in the hope of corrupting him (I, I, stanza 45).
In a striking inversion of the poem's reflection of Queen Elizabeth in several of its heroines, the Perelandran queen seems to reflect not only the biblical Eve and Spenser's Una, but also the poem's Britomart, Belphoebe, and even Acrasia.
Asleep in Titania's arms, Bottom is comically reminiscent of knightly heroes who are unmanned by a female temptress, such as Verdant in book 2 of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene (1596) who becomes the lover of Acrasia and lays "a slombering, / In secret shade, after long wanton ioyes.