acrania


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Related to acrania: exencephaly

acrania

 [ah-kra´ne-ah]
partial or complete absence of the cranium. adj., adj acra´nial.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

A·cra·ni·a

(ă-krā'nē-ă),
A group of the phylum Chordata; its members possess a notochord, gill slits, and nerve cord but no vertebrae, ribs, or skull; for example, Amphioxus, tunicates, and acorn worms.
[G. a- priv. + kranion, skull]

a·cra·ni·a

(ă-krā'nē-ă),
Complete or partial absence of a cranium; associated with meroanencephaly (anencephaly).
[G. a- priv. + kranion, skull]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

A·cra·ni·a

(ă-krā'nē-ă)
A group of the phylum Chordata, the members of which possess a notochord, gill slits, and nerve cord but no vertebrae, ribs, or skull; e.g., Amphioxus, tunicates, and acorn worms.
[G. a- priv. + kranion, skull]

a·cra·ni·a

(ă-krā'nē-ă)
Complete or partial absence of a cranium; associated with meroencephaly.
[G. a- priv. + kranion, skull]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

acrania

Partial or complete absence of the skull bones and sometimes of other head bones at birth. See also ANENCEPHALY.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Acrania

an outdated taxonomic term often used as a synonym of PROTOCHORDATE, but in some classifications limited to synonymy with CEPHALOCHORDATE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Merriam Webster, acrania was described as "congenital partial or total absence of the skull" 6 a condition that one every 20,000 babies developed in a fetal stage.
A case of Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with acrania, microcephaly, hemiplegia, epilepsy, and mental retardation.
A subsequent ultrasonographic evaluation suggested a diagnosis of acrania at approximately 20 weeks of EGA.
As early as 1996, Nicholaides et al determined that anencephaly could be detected by ultrasound and that acrania rather than absence of the cranial vault and cerebral hemispheres which is the classical finding of the second trimester should be looked for.
Major anomalies included ventriculomegaly 95(52.2%) neural tube defect 31(17.03%) cisterna magna 17(9.34%) and acrania 12(6.6%).
The 10 women who decided to continue their pregnancy (that is, who declined LTOP) had the following fetal abnormalities: spinal abnormalities (n=3), severe microcephaly (n=1), achondrogenesis (n=1), acrania (n=1), hydrops/cardiac abnormality/hydrocephalus (n=1) and hydrocephalus alone (n=3).
Exencephaly (differential diagnosis includes acrania, acalvaria, anencephaly, large encephalocele or amniotic band syndrome.) (1,3)
The size range of suspended particles trapped and ingested by the filter-feeding lancelet Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordata: Acrania).
Fine structural study of the cortical reaction and formation of the egg coats in a lancelet (=amphioxus), Branchiostoma floridae (phylum Chordata: subphylum Cephalochordata = Acrania).