acral lentiginous melanoma


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ac·ral len·tig·i·nous mel·a·no·ma

a form of malignant lentigo melanoma that occurs in palms, soles, and subungual areas.

acral lentiginous melanoma

A rare, flat, palmoplantar, subungual or intraoral (malignant) melanoma, which is more common in non-caucasians (it is the most common melanoma in Blacks and Asians); average 5-year survival < 50%; ALMs are unrelated to sun exposure, but may be related to ectopic pigmentation.

acral lentiginous melanoma

A rare, flat, palmoplantar or subungual melanoma, more common in non-whites, average 5-yr survival < 50%, unrelated to actinic exposure, but possibly related to ectopic pigmentation. See Melanoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, "Acral lentiginous melanoma mimicking benign disease: the Emory experience," Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, vol.
(18) For histology specific lifetime risk analyses, we restricted the analyses to the five most common histological subtypes based on World Health Organization (WHO)'s International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, 3rd Edition (ICD-O-3): nodular melanoma (NM) - 8721; lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM) - 8742; superficial spreading melanoma (SMM) - 8743; acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) - 8744; and desmoplastic melanoma (DM) - 8745.
(3) In addition, a number of other negative prognostic factors are present, which translates into reduced survival; these include unfavourable subungual, plantar and mucosal primary sites and a disproportionate preponderance of acral lentiginous melanoma. (3-5,22,23) In the USA, there has been a recent beneficial trend, with black patients presenting with less invasive primary lesions and at an earlier stage of disease, resulting in better survival.
Acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) is a rapidly progressive variant of malignant melanoma (MM).
Prognostic factors and survival in acral lentiginous melanoma. Br J Dermatol 2017; 177(2):428-435.
Acral lentiginous melanoma in black patients usually presents at an advanced clinical and histopathological stage with an expected poor prognosis.
In non-white populations, acral lentiginous melanoma constitutes 29% to 72% of all melanomas
Particularly important is their observation that clinicopathologic correlation is essential when dealing with these lesions, since small punches from a frank acral lentiginous melanoma may show minimal proliferation of benign-appearing melanocytes!
The term acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM), coined by Reed in 1976, applies to melanoma developing on palms, soles, and nail apparatus, which presents with clinical, histologic, and even biologic differences from melanoma developing elsewhere in the body.
(2,5,9) For example, there is some evidence that nodular melanoma and acral lentiginous melanoma have a worse prognosis than other subtypes.