acquired trait


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acquired trait

A trait that is not inherited; one resulting from the effects of the environment.
See also: trait
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic assimilation, on the other hand, is the process by which a phenotypic character initially produced only in response to an unusual environmental influence (an acquired trait) becomes, through a process of selection, taken over by the genotype, so that it is formed even in the absence of the environmental influence that at first had been necessary (King, 1968).
Not only that, humans can inherit acquired traits from those they are not related to.
For Mill, the dividing line for innate and acquired traits was birth.
Spencer was more interested in serving personal philosophical goals than biology, and actually rejected the idea of natural selection in favor of Lamarckism (the inheritance of acquired traits), which conveniently lent biological weight to classist attitudes.
Genetic and other pharmacological manipulations are often rationalized as attempts to bring all athletes to the same base level of capability, evening out all innate gene-based traits and ignoring that glaring fact that we do not understand the multiple genetic, environmental, and acquired traits that shape athletic "talent"--ambition, educational and economic opportunities, and the "fire in the belly" component, for instance--well enough to even begin to "level" them.
The study, published in The Journal of Experimental Zoology, suggests that far from being a fraud Kammerer may have discovered the field of epigenetics, placing him decades ahead of his contemporaries.Aa Paul Kammerer, a leading proponent of the Lamarckian theory of evolution, achieved global prominence in the 1920AAEs by arguing that acquired traits could be passed down through generations.