allergy

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al·ler·gy

(al'er-jē),
1. Hypersensitivity caused by exposure to a particular antigen (allergen) resulting in a marked increase in reactivity to that antigen on subsequent exposure, sometimes resulting in harmful immunologic consequences.
See also: allergic reaction, anaphylaxis, immune. Synonym(s): acquired sensitivity, induced sensitivity
2. That branch of medicine concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of allergic manifestations.
3. An acquired hypersensitivity to certain drugs and biologic materials.
[G. allos, other, + ergon, work]

allergy

(ăl′ər-jē)
n. pl. aller·gies
1. A condition in which exposure to a substance, such as pollen, latex, animal dander, or a particular food or drug, causes an overreaction by the immune system that results in symptoms such as sneezing, itching, rash, and difficulty breathing or swallowing.
2. Informal An adverse sentiment; antipathy: an allergy to cocktail parties.

allergy

Immunology
1. A state of hypersensitivity induced by exposure to a particular antigen/allergen, resulting in adverse immune reactions on subsequent re-exposure to the allergen. See Anaphylactic shock, Cross allergy, Food allergy, Hypersensitivity reaction, Latex allergy, Peanut allergy, Pseudoallergy.
2. The medical specialty dedicated to diagnosing and managing allergic disorders.

al·ler·gy

(al'ĕr-jē)
1. Hypersensitivity caused by exposure to a particular antigen (allergen) resulting in a marked increase in reactivity to that antigen on subsequent exposure, sometimes resulting in harmful consequences.
See also: allergic reaction, anaphylaxis, immune
2. That branch of medicine concerned with the study, diagnosis, and treatment of allergic manifestations.
3. An acquired hypersensitivity to certain drugs and biologic materials.
[G. allos, other, + ergon, work]

allergy

Hypersensitivity to body contact with a foreign substance (an ALLERGEN), especially grass or tree pollens, foods, dust, mites or certain metals such as nickel. The effect may take several forms, including weals (URTICARIA), DERMATITIS, ASTHMA or hay fever (ALLERGIC RHINITIS). Allergy is mediated by the E class of antibodies (IgE). An allergic response implies that there has been a prior contact with the allergen during which the immunological processes leading to the hypersensitivity have occurred. Susceptibility to allergy is often of genetic origin. The term derives from the Greek allos , other and ergon , work. See also ALLERGIC DERMATITIS.

allergy

the overreaction of the IMMUNE RESPONSE of the body to minute traces of foreign substances (antigens). The reaction is usually visible in the form of rashes, itching, breathing difficulties, etc. Many of these symptoms can be attributed to specific antigens; for example in hay fever, ANTIBODIES react against pollen (antigen) and cause local damage with the release of HISTAMINE. Antihistamine drugs are one method of counteracting the effects of histamine.

Allergy

Altered body reaction, usually hypersensitivity, as a response to exposure to a specific substance.
Mentioned in: Serum Sickness

allergy 

A state of hypersensitivity induced by re-exposure to a particular antigen (called allergen), usually environmental, such as pollens, foods, microorganisms and drugs. See allergic conjunctivitis; hypersensitivity.

al·ler·gy

(al'ĕr-jē)
1. Hypersensitivity caused by exposure to a particular antigen (allergen) resulting in a marked increase in reactivity to that antigen on subsequent exposure, some-times resulting in harmful immunologic consequences.
2. An acquired hypersensitivity to certain drugs and biologic materials.
See also: allergic reaction, anaphylaxis
Synonym(s): acquired sensitivity.
[G. allos, other, + ergon, work]

Patient discussion about allergy

Q. ALLERGIES what are they,who gets them,are they caused by pollen and food?

A. Allergy is the exaggerated and out-of-place reaction of the immune system to external substances or stimuli that are not harmful to the body, so the reaction actually damages the body instead of helping it.

The may be pollen and foods, as well as insect stings, drugs and almost any other substances.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/allergy.html
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/allergy/AA99999

Q. what is the most common allergy? is it dust allergy?

A. thanks, I've heard of a new allergy treatment and trying to learn some more about the different kinds...

Q. what are the symptoms of Allergy?

A. from you question i understand that you think you might developed an allergy. so here is a web page with couple of videos explaining about allergies:
http://www.healthline.com/video/allergies

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