agraphia

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agraphia

 [a-graf´e-ah]
loss of ability to express thoughts in writing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă),
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various portions of the cerebrum, especially those in or near the angular gyrus.
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

agraphia

(ā-grăf′ē-ə)
n.
A disorder marked by loss of the ability to write.

a·graph′ic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by the loss of a previously possessed ability to write.

Aetiology
Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
 
Clinical findings
Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity and muscle tone.

Management
Re-education, occupational therapy.

Agraphia

An acquired form of aphasia, which is characterised by a loss of a previously possessed ability to write.
Aetiology Parietal lobe tumours involving the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
Clinical findings Defects in fine motor skills, dexterity, muscle tone, and general clumsiness.
Management Re-education, occupational therapy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

agraphia

Neurology A form of aphasia, characterized by a loss in ability to write, which is most commonly seen in Pts with tumors of the parietal lobe which involve the dominant cerebral hemisphere.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a·graph·i·a

(ă-graf'ē-ă)
Inability to write properly in the absence of abnormalities of the limb; often accompanies aphasia and alexia; caused by lesions in various parts of the cerebrum.
Synonym(s): anorthography, logagraphia.
Compare: dysgraphia
[G. a- priv. + graphō, to write]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

agraphia

Acquired inability to exercise the mental processes necessary for writing. There is no disorder of hand or eye function or coordination. In right-handed and many left-handed people, agraphia results from damage in the left parietal lobe of the brain, the part concerned with language.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

agraphia 

Inability to write, usually as a result of a brain lesion. If the person can write from dictation but not from copying, it is called visual agraphia.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
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