acquired

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ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd'),
Denoting a disease, predisposition or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired

/ac·quired/ (ah-kwīrd´) incurred as a result of factors acting from or originating outside the organism; not inherited.

acquired

(ə-kwīrd′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a disease, condition, or characteristic that is not congenital but develops after birth.
2. Resulting from exposure to something, such as an antigen or antibiotic.

acquired

[əkwī′ərd]
Etymology: L, acquirere, to obtain
pertaining to a characteristic, condition, or disease originating after birth, not caused by hereditary or developmental factors but by a reaction to environmental influences outside of the organism. An example is acquired immunity. Compare congenital, familial, hereditary.

acquired

adjective New; not inherited.

acquired

adjective New, not inherited

ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd')
Denoting a disease, condition, or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired 

Pertaining to a condition which is contracted after birth and is not hereditary. See congenital; familial; hereditary.

ac·quired

(ă-kwīrd')
Denoting a disease, predisposition or abnormality that is not inherited.
[L. ac-quiro (adq-), to obtain, fr. quaero, to seek]

acquired

incurred as a result of factors acting from or originating outside the organism; not inherited.

acquired bleeding
a tendency to bleed caused by factors other than inherited and congenital ones. Includes dicoumarol and warfarin poisonings, nutritional deficiency of vitamin K, liver disease and autoimmune thrombocytopenias.
feline acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
see feline immunodeficiency virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many times the dysfunction is linked to an inherited or acquired bleeding disorder or may be discovered during a routine workup.
Most clinicians do not have onsite access to the level of expertise required to manage hemophilia A and B, Von Willebrand disease, factor deficiencies, and rare platelet and coagulation disorders such as acquired bleeding diastheses, and thrombotic disorders.
The practical guide to the laboratory diagnosis and treatment of hemostatic disorders covers both the stable and the acute stages of hereditary and acquired bleeding and thrombotic disorders.