aconitine


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a·con·i·tine

(ă-kon'i-tēn),
The exceedingly poisonous active principle (diterpene alkaloid) of Aconitum sp. and Delphinium sp., formerly used as a cardiac sedative and applied externally for neuralgia.

aconitine

(ă-kon′ĭ-tēn″, -tĭn) [ aconite + -ine]
C34H47NO11, a poisonous white crystalline alkaloid that is the active ingredient in aconite.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ventricular arrhythmic models were developed using aconitine, barium chloride, and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion methods, Wenxin Granule was administered in progressively higher doses.
One of the most famous poisonings accredited to aconitine, is that of the Roman Emperor Claudius, who died suddenly in 54 AD.
Critchley, "Aconitine poisoning following the ingestion of Chinese herbal medicines: a report of eight cases," Internal Medicine Journal, vol.
Aconitine is contained in the roots of aconite, a blue or yellow flower with green leaves related to the buttercup.
aconitine: A highly poisonous alkaloid derived from various aconite species.
In addition, Radix Aconiti lateralis Preparata contains very small amounts of the aconitum alkaloids, such as aconitine, mesaconitine, and hypaconitine, which are highly toxic but can be hydrolyzed to the more active but less toxic alkaloids, including benzoylaconine, benzoylmesaconine, and benzoylhypaconine that have significant anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities (Suzuki et al., 1994).
Aconitum carmichaeli Debx offers various therapeutic activities, but they are accompanied by acute toxicity due to the aconitine constituents.
Additionally, [O.sub.3] exposure at ambient concentrations may not cause overt functional effects, but rather may produce latent or subclinical effects that appear only when the myocardium or specialized conduction system is further stressed, for example, as a result of cellular calcium loading with aconitine. It is uncertain whether [O.sub.3] exposure elicits such effects.
Chromatographic conditions were as follows: ginsenoside Rb1 : acetonitrile-0.1% phosphoric acid (32:68); chlorogenic acid:acetonitrile-0.4% phosphoric acid (13 :87); ferulic acid : acetonitrile -0.085% phosphoric acid (17:83); aconitine : methanol-water (56 : 44).
Arrhythmogenesis was assessed 24 hr later by continuous intravenous infusion of aconitine, an arrhythmogenic drug, while heart rate and electrocardiogram were monitored.
The authors suggested that these effects may be related to the alkaloids aconitine and berberine.
Rats exposed to wDE developed arrhythmia at lower doses of aconitine than did controls; the dose was even lower in rats exposed to fDE.