acidogenic bacteria

ac·id·o·gen·ic bac·te·ria

(as'id-ō-jen'ik bak-tēr'ē-ă)
Producers of acid from fermentable carbohydrates, found in dental biofilm (q.v.); may be related to caries development.
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Although we did not have any biological evidence to conclude our findings, but literature shows that nicotine (or cotinine) decreases the phagocytic activity of monocytes and neutrophils20 and dental caries results from chronic bacterial infection by acidogenic bacteria.
This instability occurs in these liquid wastes when a small variation of the acidity produced by acidogenic bacteria results in a large variation in the pH value that leaves the favourable range for the balance of the microorganisms in the anaerobic digestion (RIBAS et al.
Acids in the mouth originate from three main sources: produced in situ by acidogenic bacteria, ingested extrinsic acids as dietary components and dislocated intrinsic acids through the backflow of gastric contents.
Acidogenesis, when the obtained in the first stage components are decomposed by the acidogenic bacteria into other organic (acetic, propionic, butanoic acids, alcohols and aldehydes) and inorganic materials ([H.
The strongest naturally occurring acid, produced by acidogenic bacteria during cariogenesis is pyruvic acid.
Postpandrial changes in methanogenic and acidogenic bacteria in the rumens of steers fed high or low forage diets once daily.
Resistant starch acts in a similar way to dietary fibres and stimulates the growth of acidogenic bacteria and short chain fatty acids, which support a number of functions and processes that are important to health.
First, acidogenic bacteria turn biomass into volatile fatty acids and acetic acid.
Results: Acidogenic bacteria such as streptococci, actinomyces, lactobacilli gave large pH drops, which easily reached pH 4.